Go Back   Paw Talk - Pet Forums > Other Pets > Reptile & Amphibian Discussion > Turtles & Tortoises



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 06-01-2004, 03:28 PM
Sigaru's Avatar
Sigaru Sigaru is offline
Playful Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 30
Sigaru is on a distinguished road
Unhappy

help! my little turtle might be sick!


he's just kind of sitting in one spot all the time, and not really moving or eating...I'm not sure what kind he is, all I know is he is a very small turtle and wont get much bigger...(his shell is probably about 1 1/2 or twice the sizeof a quarter) I was wondering if anybody knew what may be wrong with him...if anyone can help, please do. He has a brother, and his brother would be very sad if he died because we weren't able to help him
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-01-2004, 06:50 PM
Sasami's Avatar
Sasami Sasami is offline
Resident Aquarium Nerd
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
Age: 23
Posts: 9,930
Images: 15
Sasami is a jewel in the roughSasami is a jewel in the roughSasami is a jewel in the rough
I'd take him to a vet as soon as you can.
__________________
~Stephanie

"We weep for a bird's cry, but not for a fish's blood. Blessed are those with a voice."





Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-01-2004, 07:14 PM
Ravnos's Avatar
Ravnos Ravnos is offline
Herp Nerd
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Vinson Massif, Antarctica
Posts: 1,116
Ravnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of light
There are very few turtles which stay less than 4-5 inches at adult size. Anyway, without knowing what it is and how it is setup I can't even begin to give advice. Having an owner that doesn't know what he is would be his first problem. A picture would be a good start.

Rav
__________________
She sits in her corner, singing herself to sleep.
Wrapped in all of the promises, that no one seems to keep.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-01-2004, 09:40 PM
Lizgirl's Avatar
Lizgirl Lizgirl is offline
Wanted: New Title
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Washington State
Age: 37
Posts: 825
Lizgirl will become famous soon enough
Identifying him is the first step to giving you good advice. The next step is to tell us about his, history, set-up and usual diet. We want to be of help, but we need more information.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-01-2004, 10:08 PM
elfomatic's Avatar
elfomatic elfomatic is offline
Paw-Talk Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Columbia, SC
Age: 31
Posts: 1,156
elfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the rough
I am guessing that you have a Red-Earred Slider. This is the most common turtle bought by rookie keepers. Just because you were told that he wouldn't get big doesn't mean it is true. I wouldn't trust what anyone told you about general size if you haven't done your own research. Dealers love to tell people all sorts of lies about turtles when the potential buyers don't know any different.

Does your turtle look like this?

This is a picture of a Western Painted turtle but it is very close to what a hatchling Red-Earred looks like.

At any rate, there are a few general things you can do until we get more info:

1. Keep your turtle warm. Do you have a basking lamp for it? If not you need to get one. A basking lamp is basically a fixture with a bulb in it that is able to raise the temperature of a basking spot to a higher temperature than the water. You will need a thermometer to measure the temperature under the lamp. For a sick RES it should be in the low 90's.

2. Call a local vet who is a herp specialist. You will need to see a vet who specializes in reptiles -- especially when dealing with a turtle who is so young.

3. Optimize his setup. Find a good caresheet online for the type of turtle you have. Of course, in order to do this, you will have to identify his species. Make sure you have him set up right. I highly doubt that the person who sold him to you gave you the appropriate information for his care. Remember, they are only interested in making money -- not in your turtles' happiness.

Turtles can be very expensive when they are set up properly. Aquatics, for instance, can cost over $100-$200 in initial setup cost. If you can't provide the adequate environment for your turtles it would probably be best if you gave them to a reptile rescue in your area.

At the very least you should have a basking lamp/spot and a UVB light for whatever type of turtle you own.

Please let us know more info on:

1. What type of turtle it is. Can you provide a picture or at least a description?

2. What kind of setup it has. What are you housing it in? What are the temperatures like? Does it have a heat lamp? Access to natural sunlight? What are you feeding them?

3. More detail on its symptoms. Is it .. lethargic? Are the eyes swollen? Is it breathing through its mouth? Can it lift its head up? When was the last time it ate?


Most of all, don't be embarassed. A lot of people start out in turtle keeping this way because they don't know any better. I started out with one of those little plastic turtle lagoons for my RES because I didn't know what was required either. The most important thing is that you attempt to correct how you keep your turtles now that you are armed with new information. Don't let them suffer because they were given to you under false information. Good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-03-2004, 03:31 PM
Sigaru's Avatar
Sigaru Sigaru is offline
Playful Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 30
Sigaru is on a distinguished road
elfomatic, we bought the turtles at the mall. They are my brothers' turtles. The one that belongs to my little bro is the one that is sick. His name is Corey. His bro is shy, while Corey is usually very energetic and likes to swim. They're both being kept over my dad's house, and he has expierience with aquatic-type animals/pets, but isnt too sure about what is wrong with him. Here are the answers to your questions::

1.) The turtles do look like the turtle in the picture. the one that I'm talking about looks exactly like that, and his bro is a little lighter colored.

2.) He is in a 10 gallon glass fish tank with his bro. His habitat has flat rocks along one edge, piled on top of one another(somewhat) so they are out of the water. The turtles can climb up onto the rocks easily, and can go in and out of the water as they please. They have plenty of room to swim. the water is about 2 or 2 1/2 inches high(they swim rather well in it). Their habitat has a beat lamp, and gets sunlight at certain times in the day(altho its not directly next to a window). I'm not sure about the temperatures, altho it's pretty warm, but not scorching hot, and not too cold. We feed them those little turtle pellet things and lettuce. Also, the tank has a little turtle filter that has a 'tube' that goes into the water in one corner, and cleans the water, and the filter part hangs over the edge of the tank, it a square that has been cut out of the tank.

3.) The turtle looks normal and healthy. No swollen eyes, the breathing is fine..he just hasn't eaten in a couple of days, and won't move around much off the rocks.

I hope this is a little more helpful info. Please reply.

(Oh, and BTW--I'm not embarrassed. I just hope someone might know what is wrong with him. I dont really think it is very serious..probably just a little mood swing, or a stage where he doesnt feel like doing much. I just wanted to be sure)

Last edited by Sigaru; 06-03-2004 at 03:37 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-03-2004, 03:38 PM
PicOlio's Avatar
PicOlio PicOlio is offline
Movin' Up in the Pack
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Central FL, USA
Age: 43
Posts: 771
PicOlio is just really nicePicOlio is just really nicePicOlio is just really nicePicOlio is just really nicePicOlio is just really nice
Do they have any color or markings you can describe? Orange, yellow, or reddish markings where you would imagine their ears would be? Green shells, dark black or brown shells? Markings on their plastron (belly side) ... yellow or black blotches?

It's not uncommon for a turtle to go on a diet occasionally but it is sometimes a sign of a respiratory or other type of infection when they decide to stay out of the water and be still for too long.

Lettuce is usually not a good food since it has little to no nutritional value. Darker greens such as kale and collard greens are a bit better and provide some needed nutrients.

Sunlight is VERY IMPORTANT for the turtle to receive every day and not through a window since the glass blocks out the uv rays. UVB lighting can work as an alternative.

Most... not all... semi-aquatic turtles can handle, and even appreciate, more than 2.5 inches of water. If you can raise their land area to provide them more water that may be a great idea but again it really depends on what kind of turtles they are. Lil' musk turtles don't need much water...while red-ear sliders and cooters appreciate all they can get...

Please do help us help you to identify this lil tike. It will help him out a great deal for his caretakers to know exactly what kind he is.

Have you searched out a qualified herp vet in the area? The vet will be able to assist with the potential illness as well as identification. A very good sick turtle summary as well as links for finding a qualified herp vet in your area can be found by visiting:
http://www.turtletimes.com/Forums/to...TOPIC_ID=12917
__________________
- Deb
PicOlio.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-03-2004, 03:52 PM
Ravnos's Avatar
Ravnos Ravnos is offline
Herp Nerd
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Vinson Massif, Antarctica
Posts: 1,116
Ravnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of lightRavnos is a glorious beacon of light
Here's some pics to maybe help identify him - painted turtles, sliders, and cooters can all look very similar. (And will all outgrow a 10 gallon).

Painted turtles usually have red or orange on their front legs, and the underneath edges of their shell.
Painted Turtle Picture
Painted Turtle Picture
Painted Turtle Picture

Red-Eared Sliders are normally a lighter green color, and have red markings on either side of their head - hence their name.
Red-Eared Slider Picture
Red-Eared Slider Picture
Red-Eared Slider Picture

Cooters are usually brightly marked with yellow as babies. The markings fade as they get older.
Cooter Picture
Cooter Picture
Cooter Picture

UV lighting is absolutely necessary for all the above turtles. They cannot properly make use of calcium without it. A 10 gallon may also not afford enough room to get away from the basking area - so it may be getting too warm - which can potentially cause respiratory problems.

Rav
__________________
She sits in her corner, singing herself to sleep.
Wrapped in all of the promises, that no one seems to keep.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-03-2004, 09:57 PM
elfomatic's Avatar
elfomatic elfomatic is offline
Paw-Talk Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Columbia, SC
Age: 31
Posts: 1,156
elfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the rough
If he looks healthy then he may just be trying to bask. Have you taken a temperature reading under the basking spot? For a healthy Red Earred Slider (which is probably what he is) the basking spot temps should be in the 80-85 degree range. It is very important to actually monitor this temperature range. Otherwise, it is harder for your turtle to digest and they will sit and sun more often then they would have to otherwise.

I wouldn't worry too much as long as he continues to be alert and otherwise active. Like Picolio said, sometimes they lose their appetite for a few days. If it goes on for more than a week or two I would start to worry about illness more seriously. Turtles can go a long time without food but most aquatic species are ready eaters. If he continues this way you would then want to consider a possible upper respiratory infection (common in aquatics) or a heavy parasite load. If your turtle has an overload of parasites (common term for a variety of microbes) that could also cause a loss of appetite but it isn't commonly a problem for aquatics -- more for land dwellers.

You are probably going to want to look into buying a bigger setup for him ... like others have said, he will get a lot bigger. I would suggest going as big as you can comfortably afford since you don't want to have to keep upgrading every 6 months anyway. If you are really strapped for cash you can just use a heavy duty rubbermaid container ... it doesn't look pretty but your little guys won't really care and will be much happier in the larger setup. Keep in mind that eventually you are going to either need a 100 gal. tank or greater -- either that or an outdoor pond.

It is important that you make provisions for the UVB. They can't get UVB rays through the window, as Picolio said. You can buy a UVB florescent or coil from a good pet store ... just make sure you actually check to make sure it says UVB. You'll know by the price ... they don't cost less than $15 .. see if you can find an amount on the packaging ... you should go for at least 5% UVB ... most brands make 3%, 5%, and 8% tubes.

UVB is extremely important ... as Rav said, for them to metabolize their vitamin D3. Without it, they will suffer from something known as Metabolic Bone Disease ... or soft-shell disease. Their bones and shell won't be able to form properly ... and this can be fatal. If you can't afford a UVB light you need to make arrangements for them to recieve natural sunlight every day for at least a half hour. A half hour a day is thought to be about equivalent to a day's worth of UVB lighting. Just make sure that they are supervised the entire time ... turtles smaller than 6 inches are preyed upon by birds, cats, dogs, ants, and children to name a few things. And do not leave them in the sun in a glass enclosure ... they will overheat. Make sure their area has partial shade as well.

As far as diet goes .. turtle pellets should make up about 25% of the diet because they are high in protein. You can probably get away with a higher percentage now when they are young though because young RES (and other aquatics) are highly carnivorous. I would add a lot of cooked meat to their diet. You can used canned tuna...chicken ... shrimp ... and crickets, earthworms, feeder fish, and snails are appreciated as well. You can get the insects from your local petstore ... either live or in cans. I don't recommend collecting them from the wild because you risk introducing parasites and pesticides. As far as veggies go ... try dark, leafy greens. If you can get them to eat orange-colored things like sweet potato and carrots that is good too -- high in vitamin A. They will appreciate veggies more when they get older.

I would also try a calcium supplement ... either cuttlebone (commonly sold for birds) or those turtle-shaped calcium blocks work fine. Don't be surprised if they bite off large chunks at a time.

Well, sorry for all the info. Hope I haven't overwhelmed you. But if I mention one thing I have to mention it all, you know? Good luck!

Last edited by elfomatic; 06-03-2004 at 10:02 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-03-2004, 10:45 PM
RSbunny's Avatar
RSbunny RSbunny is offline
Tarzan Mama of Two
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The land down under!
Age: 31
Posts: 7,329
RSbunny is a splendid one to beholdRSbunny is a splendid one to beholdRSbunny is a splendid one to beholdRSbunny is a splendid one to beholdRSbunny is a splendid one to beholdRSbunny is a splendid one to beholdRSbunny is a splendid one to behold
wow great info Elf!
__________________
Too lazy to even think of a siggy
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-05-2004, 06:50 PM
Sigaru's Avatar
Sigaru Sigaru is offline
Playful Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 30
Sigaru is on a distinguished road
okie dokes, well my dad figured out what is wrong with him..his front leg is just hurt. So we're gonna let him rest for a while and see how he does...it should get better. thanks for all the help guys!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-05-2004, 06:52 PM
Sigaru's Avatar
Sigaru Sigaru is offline
Playful Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 30
Sigaru is on a distinguished road
oh, and he has been that size for almost a year now, so I really dont think he is gonna get bigger...
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-05-2004, 06:55 PM
Sigaru's Avatar
Sigaru Sigaru is offline
Playful Pup
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 30
Sigaru is on a distinguished road
at least not much bigger

and thanks again!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-05-2004, 10:20 PM
elfomatic's Avatar
elfomatic elfomatic is offline
Paw-Talk Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Columbia, SC
Age: 31
Posts: 1,156
elfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the roughelfomatic is a jewel in the rough
Well, you really do need to be sure. Even if you know what is wrong with your turtle/that your turtle is fine it is still a good idea to know about the species that you own and their general care/expectations. Believe me, it can be drastically different depending on the species.

I strongly encourage you to find out for sure. If you do indeed have anything other than a mud/musk turtle -- which looks hardly nothing like the picture I posted above -- then it should get bigger. If it is not growing that is a sign that something is wrong with your husbandry -- either through diet or some other means. Most aquatic species grow about an inch or so a year (generally).
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-23-2008, 02:09 PM
jlacosse jlacosse is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: escanaba Michigan
Posts: 1
jlacosse is on a distinguished road

growth of turtles


I know that it seems liek your turtle is not growing but they can live up to 100years and will get larger over time(provided they have rrom to grow) I have had a red eared slider as well as a painter turtle for 7 years. My slider (like the one you presumably have) is noticeably larger after the 7 years (about doubled in size, although still very small). It took about 3 years ebfore we noticed any change though. Also keep a very careful eye on your sick one. I thought one of mine also had a "sore leg" because he held it in clsoe and didnt move it mich (actually looked kinked in a way) but he had the beginning of metabolic bone disease which is becasue he wasnt getting enough sun, right nutrition etc for a couple weeks. They can deteriorate rapidly so make sure water is clean, proper feeding, and UV lamp or sun daily (at least 1/2 hour). If he truly has problems moving keeop him out of water (especially at night time ) so he does not drown. Hope all goes well.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
collard greens, eared slider, eared sliders, fish tank, metabolic bone disease, pet store, respiratory infection, upper respiratory infection


 
You may also search for:


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Sitemap:1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
Sponsor Our Community

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Contents Copyright 2001-2006 Paw-Talk Pet Forums and Paw-Talk.Net