Terrorist Cat vs Innocent Puppy - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
Cats Your scratching post for anything feline related!

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2009, 09:01 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4
 
Terrorist Cat vs Innocent Puppy

That may be overstating it a bit, but Karma the 10-year old male cat we took in about 10 years ago is very territorial and virtually unaffectionate. Our nephew found him in a creek with a brick tied around his neck, which explains his wariness of other living things.

He's been strictly an indoor cat. When a neighbor's cat wanders in the house, Karma immediately attacks it. He won't allow anyone to hold him for more than about 10 seconds. He will bite anyone who pets him too far down along his back.

I should have had him neutered. Is it too late? If not, might it make a significant difference in his disposition and behavior?

I keep his bowl filled with dry cat food, and a couple times a day feed him some moist food. He throws up often.

He whines and makes the noise a sheep makes a lot, often keeping my wife awake at night.

So much for Karma.

My wife is disabled and spends 23 hours a day on the couch resting and watching TV - Sci Fi mostly. The cat is no company, of course. What's worse is my sister in law who is a drug-addicted, manipulative scavenger of the worst kind.

Because my wife has seizure disorder, she cannot drive and is a "sitting duck" for her sister. My wife is weakened by her health problems and not good at saying "no" to her sister, which just makes things worse.

I decided to get my wife a puppy. She's wanted a Maltese for several years. I found a Maltese-Yorkie mix I’m going to pick up on Saturday. This pet should not grow larger than 5 pounds. It should be able to jump up on the couch without hurting Carol. I expect it to give Carol more unconditional love in a day than her sister has given her in the last 10 years.

I was ready to take Karma to the vet to have him put down - not because he did anything wrong, but just because Carol's happiness is more important to me than Karma's.

It's still hard for both Carol and me to do this to an innocent cat. The problem is he's not very desirable for adoption, and I have no doubt he would kill a 4 or 5 pound puppy.

I do believe there are fates worse than death - being left out on the road somewhere to freeze or starve. Or to be abused. Or simply to be traumatized by being removed from a comfortable, familiar home.

I'm willing to spend money on Karma to have him neutered (if medically practical), to get him caught up on shots and tests. I feel we owe him that much.

I could keep him in the basement, but he would not be happy there long-term.

I know I'm opening myself up for lots of criticism here - but that's okay. I have found several no-kill shelters around Ohio, which we can check out. But just looking at their websites tells me they're not very sympathetic with people "disposing" of their cats.

Thanks for any advice!
pilk00 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2009, 09:53 PM
Paw-Talk Lifer
 
Kendalle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Iowa
Posts: 5,083
  
Would your wife be able to take a puppy out every hour or so to go potty? Would she be able to play with it and walk it?

Honestly your cat doesn't sound like he is that bad, some cats just do their own thing. My cats would attack any strays we let in the house as well, they are territorial. Hence the term "cat fight" when it comes to jealousy and things.

Take the cat to the vet, get it checked up, switch it to good sensitive stomach food.

[/CENTER]

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Kendalle is offline  
post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2009, 10:35 PM
Movin' Up in the Pack
 
becrac16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 626
 
Talk about karma. Going to kill your cat because you don't like it anymore (which sounds like the deal, since you have had him for 10 years) brings you wayyyy down in the karma points. I wouldn't be surprised if you killed your cat and ended up with a horrible tycoon of a puppy, which Kendalle has already made a very good point of.

If you are that desperate, *heartless*coughcough* a no-kill shelter would be your best bet. Of course they hate people who dump their pets. Which is kind of funny, since you saved Karma, but now are doing the exact same thing that you saved her from.

I would be willing to bet millions that you are not going to get ANY supporters here for killing your cat.
becrac16 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2009, 10:40 PM
Paw-Talk Addict
 
FlickeringHope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Michigander
Posts: 1,468
 
Don't put him down! What he needs is love, not lost. Unfortunately, neutering and vaccinations still may not do anything, his behavior is too far engraved into his mind to be changed by a neuter. What he needs is healing. You might want to call around and find a pet therapist. I know that sounds silly, but I think that's your best option, and thus, his best option. Does he have a collar? My next suggestion will sound silly, too...

I don't know if you've heard of Crystal Healing, but it's a technique practiced, using stones(y'know...diamonds, emeralds, sapphires, quartz..) those kind of stones. Stones can be attached to a pet's collar to give the desired effect or health benefit. You would want a nice, relaxing stone. Let me do some research into what might be best.

http://crystal-cure.com/gem-healing.html

Here's a link that gives a brief synopsis of what Crystal Healing is, plus an assortment of options for healing crystals.

Personally, I'd suggest a bright color, such as the Citrine. Citrine is incapable of festering any negative energy, and thus creates a very positive atmosphere.

It also says Citrine is good for digestive problems, which may aide his vomiting.

Clear Crystal Quartz is also a good choice. It's well known for being a protecting stone, and a healer.

Amber is also another good choice, like Citrine, it's bright color festers positive energy, instead of negative.

Sodalite could potentially work... see the reason why, here:

http://www.sobrietystones.com/resour...s_sodalite.htm

Also Hematite:

http://www.sobrietystones.com/resour...s_hematite.htm

Good luck! Don't give up on him! He needs you!

Last edited by FlickeringHope; 12-03-2009 at 10:48 PM.
FlickeringHope is offline  
post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2009, 10:22 AM
Official Loofah Tester
 
Storyseeker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: SE United States
Posts: 1,365
Blog Entries: 13
 
I can feel your pain with this.

You're dealing with supporting your wife through a debilitating chronic disease, a toxic sister in law, and to top it off, an emotionally damaged cat. God bless you sweetheart, to say your emotional resources are probably stretched to the limit is an understatement. As anyone who's ever been a long term caregiver to a spouse, parent, or child will know, it can be the biggest struggle of one's life. You also have that vampire sister in law who is draining the life further from you and your wife? Though some others may disagree with me strongly, I'd say poor Karma's the least of your pain.

I admire that you are trying to work through options rather than just dump him like so many would. Of course it's not Karma's fault in the least, but I know first hand about having a pet who is hard to bond with. It's heartbreaking because you want what's best for the animal and don't have the resources to do better, and the animal is for whatever reason incapable of reciprocating in a way that is helpful to you. It's a true labor of love, emphasis on labor. And because of your wife's health issues, your stress situation was probably much better ten years ago when you rescued him.

I would wholeheartedly agree that getting a dog is not going to automatically be just what your wife needs. In fact, unless the dog is already well trained and older, I'd say it probably isn't a good choice at all. The best thing you could probably do is find someone who can help you cope with the real problem in your life, which is your sister in law. Find a reputable psychologist (many have a payment plan if money is an issue), a clergy, someone. Find a way to get her out of your life and/or her influence. My husband and I finally broke down and went to a referred psychologist when dealing with a toxic situation of our own. Six motivated visits and two years later, our lives are unrecognizable from the mess we'd allowed it to become before.

Just to help you get a little outside perspective because it is so hard to see the forest then the trees are beating you to heck and back--But a puppy is going to be a huge stress on you and your wife until it can be trained properly to be a good companion, which can sometimes take two to three years of big time investment.

Until then you are dealing with barking, scratching, biting, teething, potty training, hyper puppy energy, and house cleaning. If you've got a mellow breed, and the dog is also very quiet by nature (unlikely), and the dog is very smart and responsive to training, you might luck out and have all that worked out at six months. I don't know of many maltese who are good candidates for that. They're independent and snazzy little guys. What I would hazard a guess at is, that one thing you really can't handle is even more stress.

I would say this even if you did not have a cat.


If you didn't have a cat, I would recommend doing research and asking around for an already proven adult dog companion. With patience, it's even possible to find a large dog with the kind of restraint and sensitivity to be a great companion for her. You might even want to look into getting an assistance dog. I'm not sure of your wife's condition and I won't pry, but you mentioned seizures...perhaps you would qualify for a seizure assistance dog? You would also benefit from professionals matching you and your wife to the right dog rather than guesswork.

You may want to look at getting a well trained, cat friendly larger dog anyway as it's unlikely that Karma could kill him/her. Whatever you do, I'd take the time to find a place to introduce any dog you got to Karma away from the house on neutral territory. And if possible, let the dog settle in for a short while before reintroducing Karma back into his turf (this isn't professional advice, it just seems like a logical suggestion given what amount I do know of animal nature).

I also agree with others that neutering Karma is not going to help. His behaviors are pretty deeply set by this time. Since you are mentally struggling over this, I honestly think it would be doing you, your wife, and your cat a disservice to euthanize him on the remote gamble that the puppy she gets will be the perfect lap companion and not as much or more of a hardship than Karma. I expect a lose/lose situation for everyone here.


I'll say a prayer for you, my friend. For you, your wife, and your kitty. Hang in there.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Hanging out in the Land of New Feetsies:
Melon, Skinner, Black Pete, Zanna, Custard, Tucker, Jeffrey, Zmei, and Windham.

Last edited by Storyseeker; 12-04-2009 at 10:47 AM. Reason: paragraph break
Storyseeker is offline  
post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2009, 10:31 AM
Rodentologist
 
Jennicat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,941
  
I would definitely take him to the vet and have him evaluated as well. Throwing up "all the time" is not normal and can be a sign of sickness.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Jennicat is offline  
post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2009, 10:34 AM
Part of the Pack
 
Zylca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Austin, Tx
Posts: 374
 
*tosses two cents*

Unless there is something specifically wrong with the cat I would not think that being put down is not the ideal option. You must be frustrated and it seems that you have worse issues to tolerate than your cat.

Better quality food will help with your cat tossing it's cookies all the time.

Don't assume the cat will reject the dog. It sounds possible but you never know. Perhaps look into a cat perch where the cat will have it's own area to escape too.

If the cat has to go....I don't think that finding a new home that will accept the cat as it is would be a worse fate than death. Perhaps it will take a bit longer to find someone who has the resources and time to spend with him to avoid a bad placement.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Zylca is offline  
post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2009, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4
 
Thanks to everyone for the advice!

I drove 3 hours to Columbus OH yesterday to pick up Misty, a less than 2 pound Morky (Maltese-Yorkie). She's about 9 weeks old.

When I got home I noticed our furnace had started working. Karma?

By 1 am or so we got our heat back on.

Karma (the cat) is locked safely away in an extra bedroom with his litter box, food and water. Later today, we plan to put the puppy in a bedroom, and let the cat out, figuring maybe the 2 animals can become acquainted gently at first by sense of smell.

When Karma does meet Misty he will be on a harness and leash - since the puppy is no larger than a big rat.

Another possible solution to our problem would be to let Karma live in the basement with free access to the out of doors.

However, he would first have to be neutered as there are many indoor/outdoor cats in the neighborhood, and secondly our next-door neighbor has asked us not to let Karma outside because she has seen how "mean", "hostile" (whatever word you want to use) he is.

Indoor "kennels" are something I may look into.

My wife and I need to get into couple's counseling to help us deal with her pathological sister.

We're on a co-existence track with the animals, and a re-commitment to establishing boundaries to protect my wife from her parasitic sister.

Also I plan to get Karma to the vet for a general checkup and to see what's up with his stomach problems.

Thanks again.
pilk00 is offline  
post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2009, 01:24 PM
Paw-Talk Addict
 
FlickeringHope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Michigander
Posts: 1,468
 
You're thinking about putting Karma in a kennel...?
FlickeringHope is offline  
post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2009, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlickeringHope View Post
You're thinking about putting Karma in a kennel...?
I was thinking about putting one of both in an indoor cage, kennel, whatever they're called - IF our plan for co-existence doesn't work out - or maybe as means towards getting the 2 animals used to each other without the puppy being endangered.

Today I went to the pet store and bought a harness and a 4-ft leash for Karma - as a safety precaution for when the 2 meet.
pilk00 is offline  
post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2009, 05:41 PM
Paw-Talk Lifer
 
Kendalle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Iowa
Posts: 5,083
  
I don't think you really have thought about how much work a puppy will be for your wife. But, good luck.

[/CENTER]

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Kendalle is offline  
post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2009, 05:53 PM
Paw-Talk Addict
 
FlickeringHope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Michigander
Posts: 1,468
 
NOT a good idea, dude. Do you have any idea the mental trauma being shoved into a kennel will inflict?

Let me put it into perspective for you....

I live in a house with 28 cats. Some are rescues, others are the product of my fiance's mother's failed breeding business. She ran out of funds, didn't have the money to get any of the cats fixed, and now we have...7 cats in kennels. The day is filled with their lonely calls, just begging to be released.

Most of the cats in crates are males - who, because they aren't fixed, will maul each other to death if they're left together. They piss on each other through their crates, cry, and yowl for attention and love.

Don't think for a moment that putting that cat in a kennel is a good idea - you could potentially stress him out to the point that he dies. He needs to be treated with love and respect, not shoved into a kennel. There IS hope to fixing him. But it will take a lot of time, and a lot of positive reinforcement. He's not a hopeless case - not by far.

He needs pet therapy, and someone who understands him, which, though it may sound silly, they do exist. He's a shell of bottled up negative energy which needs to be released, and if you were to put him in a crate, that bottled up energy would grow and grow and grow until it destroyed him.

Last edited by FlickeringHope; 12-06-2009 at 05:56 PM.
FlickeringHope is offline  
post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2009, 06:01 PM
Hello Earthling
 
canadiancritter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Age: 25
Posts: 4,729
Blog Entries: 5
 
I have to say that I don't agree on exiling the cat to another room or the basements or the outside. Even if the cats doesn't let attention.

A puppy is a lot of work.....





canadiancritter is offline  
post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-07-2009, 08:48 PM
Movin' Up in the Pack
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 802
 
You will be not far from being irresponsible pet owner if you giving up somebody's life with those reasons. I would say, you got puppy in not perfect time..

"Play with me and keep me busy! You have your work, your entertainment, and friends. I only have you! " - Unknown

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Visit -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- for fun and tips for pets!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
wishbone is offline  
Reply

Tags
conflict, euthanasia, no-kill


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome