Inbreeding Guiena Pigs - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
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post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-22-2007, 07:55 PM Thread Starter
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Inbreeding Guiena Pigs

I've heard that inbreeding Guiena Pigs will make them retarded just like human brother + sister that...well, anyway, are they like dogs where just their bad qualities and well as good qualities pass on or is it different with them? Is it bad for their health if you do it for generations or is it bad from the start?

Also, please don't think I'm getting any ideas, a few questions don't mean anything, and for the input needs I'd like to be as educated as I can.
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post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-22-2007, 08:07 PM
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i'm not sure if it is guinea pig spesific to not breed siblings. its not good for any living thing to be inbred. Over generations defects become noticeable. same with people, same with anything. I'm sure that there are inbred pigs born that are perfectly ok, bot not all and in genral isn't a good idea.

I'm pretty sure that it's like dogs, good as well as bad qualities are brought down... it just becomes more noticable that mutations accur. These mutations COULD pass down even if its not inbreding... it's just that reccessive trats would be less likely to show up with a large breding population.

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post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-22-2007, 08:09 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you Kendalle.
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post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-22-2007, 10:01 PM
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Apparently some people put inbreeding in their lines to try and "better" the lines.

I personally do not agree with inbreeding,because this weakens the genes and plus bad qualities and traits and also illnesses are passed on this way.





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post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-22-2007, 10:46 PM
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Linebreeding is an excellent way to find any problems with your breeding animals.

Inbreeding does not make problems....it brings any problems that are already in the line out. It saves a breeder unknowingly passing on 'hidden' problems. A breeder that inbreeds responsibly is a responsible breeder!

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post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2007, 08:37 AM
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I wouldn't reccomend it to anyone... as others have said, it strengthens both good and bad qualities.

As to "bringing out the bad qualities in a line", it seems sort of harsh to produce animals with severe problems just to check qualities in a line. After all, the animals have to live with the problems that breeders create in them. Not to mention that, with guinea pigs, the problems a responsible breeder would be screening for wouldn't appear until after the pigs are too old to breed anyway (in the case of females)
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post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2007, 05:20 PM
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If the problems produced from a inbred pairing were severe, the litter would be culled and the line the pair were from removed from a breeding program. Its better to lose 1 litter than pass on potential problems to other breeders or people

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post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2007, 05:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharni
Linebreeding is an excellent way to find any problems with your breeding animals.

Inbreeding does not make problems....it brings any problems that are already in the line out. It saves a breeder unknowingly passing on 'hidden' problems. A breeder that inbreeds responsibly is a responsible breeder!
i very much agree


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post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2007, 06:57 PM
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It's better not to breed at all.
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post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2007, 10:28 PM
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post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2007, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharni
If the problems produced from a inbred pairing were severe, the litter would be culled and the line the pair were from removed from a breeding program. Its better to lose 1 litter than pass on potential problems to other breeders or people
I would guess that would be true if the breeder was more interested in lines than lives. As I said, the problems wouldn't even show up until the pigs were too old to have been bred anyway, so it makes it a moot point.
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post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-24-2007, 12:24 AM
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That is not true...problems can arise at any age...it depends on what the problems are. So the point certainly isnt moot . And the breeder should be responsible for both lines and lives...no good breeding lines that results in substandard problematic lives!

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post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-24-2007, 12:32 AM
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Problems can arise at any age, but genetically linked problems in guinea pigs tend to manifest after the age of 1 year, and a female needs to be bred for the first time before 9 months or so of age to prevent serious complications caused by births.

These problems include bladder stones, bone problems in satins and satin carriers, immuno problems, various cancers, and allergies to certain common surgical sutures.

Guinea pigs under 1 year of age typically do not display these problems, and if they do, their so severe that you wouldn't NEED to do a linebreeding for these problems to be showing up all over the place in your lines. Younger pigs tend more towards infectious problems and problems stemming from substandard care.

In a hypothetical situation, it would be like having to breed a dog before 1 year of age for it's health -- knowing that OFA certifications, etc, generally are not viable until MUCH later. You really have no idea what you're breeding into, and you can breed several generations off of one line before the types of problems you're trying to screen with GPs becomes apparent.
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post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-24-2007, 09:51 AM
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This is random - but do GP's must have genetic problems that are not problems for the carriers? Because I know that sometimes when you breed two dwarf rabbits, if a baby gets the dwarf gene from both parents then it turns out to be a 'peanut' and dies soon after birth. But if it only gets one dwarf gene, then it's a dwarf rabbit and survives and isn't considered to have bad genes.

So I guess what I'm trying to get at is that if you don't inbreed at all, and some of the piggies are carries for something but don't get effected by it - then it's only bad if you happen to breed them to another pig with the same defective gene, in which case the offspring could be effected. Either way the only way to find out theres a problem would be if you happened to breed two pigs with the same defect.

Couldn't it also be possable that one sibling gets the bad gene, and one doesn't - so that inbreeding would result in healthy babies but you would still have bad lines?

That sucks though if it's true that genetic problems manifest in them after 1 year, and after they've probably already been breed.

I'm not trying to start a debate here, I'm just curous! But why inbreed if there's a chance you could miss a defective gene (by my logic, I could be wrong), you could possably find out the same info from just regular breeding...and if the defects don't show up until after 1 year sometimes?

Too bad they're isn't just a way to test the genetics of an animal beforehand without having to actually breed them.


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post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-24-2007, 09:59 AM
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Yes, you bring up a good point. There is a gene in guinea pigs that's responsible for dalmation or roan coloring. And breeding two of these color pigs together results in what's known as a "lethal" guinea pig. Most are blind and deaf, they generally have teeth problems (either no teeth, or alignment problems), and various internal problems that have not been well studied.

Breeding dalxdal or roanxroan is common among some breeders because it gives you a better chance of getting dalmation or roan pigs. But it carries a 1 in 4 chance of giving you a lethal. So theoretically, you could breed two fo these pigs and have completely normal babies... or, like a local rescue here, your roan mother could have 4 severely messed up babies that need a lifetime of specialized care.

Although non-dominant traits and health issues are MORE likely to come out if you linebreed animals and basically try to double up on that non-dominant gene, it's still possible for them to produce entire litters of healthy animals while harboring a genetic problem.
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