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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-18-2009, 07:18 AM Thread Starter
 
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Nail clipping

I think my girls nails need a trim, they are quite sharp and don't seem to be wearing down, I was wondering about the best way to help them out without the trauma of having to hold them whilst clipping, would it be better to maybe put a patch of sandpaper on the floor of their house? is there a risk of them hurting their feet on the coarse surface? Any advice would be great! By the way, my last rats never seemed to have the need for nail clipping, I don't know why....
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-18-2009, 08:13 AM
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Some people swear by putting some sandpaper or a rock or brick in the cage to file the nails down. That has never worked for my boys. I just accept the fact that their nails are sharp and only clip them if they start getting too long. Some of them do quite well with it and I can do it all by myself. Others require someone to hold them while they cry/poop/pee.

Maureen


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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-18-2009, 03:10 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thank you, will try the brick thing for a little while, see if it makes a difference
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-18-2009, 06:29 PM
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people say you need to put the brick like under their water bottle or in places that they have to go so that they really do have contact with the brick.


i don't know if it really helps, but it works for some people.


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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-18-2009, 08:41 PM
 
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I used to keep a cinder block in my girl's large cage but it got really gross after about a year so I threw it away. It worked great while I had it though.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-20-2009, 06:12 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the advice, will give it a go!
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-21-2009, 09:02 PM
 
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I've heard putting sandpaper in there is a great way, I hope that helps
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