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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-02-2010, 09:35 AM Thread Starter
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Unhappy What Can I Do??

I have a gorgeous 2year old male mouse, Over the past few days he has more and more shown symptoms of loss of appetite, weight loss, low energy, fatigue, continuous sleeping, intense breathing, and keeps his eyes closed opening them only slightly.
I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas to help me
Is there something that can perk up his energy eg particular food?

He is dearly loved, I just need some help.
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-02-2010, 02:50 PM
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I say he needs a vet. he might have a URI which is treatable. Your vet can gently palpate him for internal masses, etc

or have him humanely pts if he's suffering.

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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-02-2010, 03:34 PM
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i would also say that he needs a vet. I hope that he gets feeling better!
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-02-2010, 08:47 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the advice, would you know much more on URI's, he's extremely old for a mouse, he's perked up today and responsive etc, he's running around at the moment can mice recover naturally? or is this something that really should be checked out...
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-05-2010, 09:39 AM
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Quote:
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Thank you for the advice, would you know much more on URI's, he's extremely old for a mouse, he's perked up today and responsive etc, he's running around at the moment can mice recover naturally? or is this something that really should be checked out...
URI's can easily kill your mouse quickly...it can stay the same for awhile then the infection takes over and the mouse can die. URI's really should be medicated.

I have had several old mice, well over 2, how old is your boy?

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-06-2010, 03:46 AM Thread Starter
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my old boy is approximately 2 years 5ish months I think. He has showed signs of alertness for the past few days, now is back to his running around the place, appetite is slowly returning however still doesn't eat as much as he used to, he was what people would consider obese and has lost some of that weight. however still sleeping longer periods than my 2month year old boys. Shall i still be worried? thank you for so much of your help its a pleasure having someone else to talk to this about.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-06-2010, 05:57 AM
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Are you able to feel his belly at all? Those **** tumors and old mice...I lost Saffron to that and am watching Daisy another oldie here...at least 25 months.

Does he have a wheel? I often judge how my mice feel by their efforts on the wheel or lack of running on it altogether.

Is he eating, pooping, drinking well? How's his URI, is it better?

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-07-2010, 05:37 AM Thread Starter
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Are you able to feel his belly at all? Those **** tumors and old mice...I lost Saffron to that and am watching Daisy another oldie here...at least 25 months.

Does he have a wheel? I often judge how my mice feel by their efforts on the wheel or lack of running on it altogether.

Is he eating, pooping, drinking well? How's his URI, is it better?
He shows no signs of tumors, he actually has lost weight around his belly. My condolences for Saffron and hope Daisy gets better. I had a previous mouse, Sleeping Beauty she passed on from a huge tumor on her rump. was heart breaking to watch. you must be going through a hard time with Daisy
He has a wheel doesn't run on it as often as he had, but he is a house trained mouse so he's out for walks everyday and comes back when called. he still drinking and eating is improving still minimal to his previous eating habits.
he's perked up and shows no signs of pain, i haven't taken him to a vet...
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-07-2010, 06:38 AM
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Why haven't you taken him to the vet, I"m confused.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-09-2010, 01:09 AM Thread Starter
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your'll probably find this extremely strange as a reason. but I am a student money is short and vets are expensive. I also believe in Nature takes its course.. he isn't in pain, I would only take him if he was getting worse and he hasn't, he's gotten much better and is back to his old self. I hope you can see my reason
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-09-2010, 06:26 AM
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No, I don't find it strange. Plenty of people try to glamorize passive neglect as a belief in being more natural. Pets aren't natural. If you want nature, go watch wildlife. If you want a pet, be prepared to provide for it's needs and not just wait and see if it dies from a treatable illness.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-09-2010, 09:20 AM
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Pets are just as capable of building up their immune systems to illnesses just as humans are. And you can actually do more damage by constantly running your pets or yourself, for that matter, off to a doctor, and you're probably making yourself and your pets chemically dependent on medications.

Pets can heal from their own illnesses if you give them a chance, they're not too "weak" due to domestication, domestication has done nothing to prevent them from being able to heal themselves, but with all the medication they're given for every little thing, it's probably made it harder to accomplish. Natural medicine is so much more efficient in making the adjustment process easier.

Wolf, you're not being a passive neglectful owner, you're being a caring, and supportive owner. I hail from the same belief as you - I have one guinea pig, and one rabbit, three cats, and one rescued Deer mouse, who have never been sick in their entire lives. The fact of the matter is, Wolf, that mass majority won't look kindly on your beliefs, that's just how our species has evolved - our species has evolved to fully entrust our own health and the health of our pets to a complete stranger, who checks them over and assigns expensive pills to be shoved down our loving pet's throats.
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-09-2010, 12:45 PM
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I understand that you have this romanticized notion that wild animals never get sick, never have parasites, and live to be old and feeble before quietly dying in their sleep. I'm not sure how I can disabuse you of that "Disney-esque" delusion.

In the wild, animals get parasites. In the wild, they die of infections and ailments, the same as our regular animals do. Actually, scratch that -- many of them are not alive to develop the types of conditions that our animals do because they live short, brutal lives which aren't conducive to ending up with old-age problems. Just because you don't see it happening doesn't mean that they're hardier or have better immune systems -- they die.

I asked the local wildlife rehabber about this notion that wild animals have wonderful immune systems because they're not getting all this medication, and she suggested that I tell that to the enormous amounts of bats currently dying off from fungal infections. A wild mouse has an average lifespan of around six months. A domestic mouse has an average lifespan of two years. The average lifespan of a wild rabbit is less than a year. The average lifespan of a domestic house rabbit is 10-12 YEARS. If your goal is to quarter, or even sixteenth your animal's life, then by all means choose natural.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Last edited by Jennicat; 09-09-2010 at 12:50 PM.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-09-2010, 01:35 PM
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Soo Hope, when you rabbit or guineapig stop eating and go into stasis, you won't take them to the vet? Let them get through it naturally?

You can leave a mildly ill animal (rats, mice) for a day or even 2 to see if they improve on their own, but if they worsen you had better RUN your arse to the vet as they are going to only get worse, and need the vet. YOU obviously have had some bad experiences with vets, they charged you too much, needless medications? There are bad vets out there but there are also wonderful vets. The owner and the vet are supposed to be a team to keep your animal healthy and hale. But you have to know when to bring your animal to the vet.

As for domestication weakening our animals? In the case of the rat it has. Actually its the BYB's and the mills who have weakened them to the extent that some areas only have rats that are old by 12 months, and elderly by 18 months. The rats in my area are now prone to narrow heads (more URI's), terrible back ends, where females get HED regularly. PT's, tumors, and even heart issues. Years ago before the rat became more popular (before Ratatouille *gag*) some rats were known to live 4-5 years sometimes. Now that is a miracle to have happen.

The wild animals are NOT healthier. I have had many half-wild rats (rescues) and some died very young, and most died before 22 months. They had tumors and heart issues and stroke, etc. The mom was healthy all her life, so the bad genes came from wild dad. One tumor on a girl was something my vet had never ever seen. The tumor on her head made her look like a dinosaur.

Wolf, if your mouse is feeling better that's good but keep an eye on him. It takes very little to cure a mouse of a URI.

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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-13-2010, 01:28 AM Thread Starter
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Hey Guys, I feel there may be some confusion, I would NEVER let an animal suffer, my terminology may have been ill referenced. by Natural causes I was meaning if he were to pass on through old age I wouldn't force him to keep living by pumping him with medicines, however if an animal were in pain i would never hesitate to take them to the vet. I hadn't taken him to the vet because he had recovered back to normal, he's back to his running around eating pooping, sleeping socializing etc. so i just want to clarify i wasn't neglecting him by not taking him to the vet I just thought why distress him if he's back to his normal self.
Please do understand through i'm never going to let an animal suffer and "Natures course" wasn't meant in the term that if an animal were in pain i wouldn't seek a veterinarians help.
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