any opinion is appreciated - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
Chinchilla Discussion Twitching whiskers, fluffy tails, silky soft fur and all else chinchilla!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 12:31 AM Thread Starter
Adolescent Pup
 
mcglothlin2803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 34
Posts: 79
 
any opinion is appreciated

i have a young male chinchilla, hes just over 6 months old. his mother is a hetero beige, and his father is a standard (i have both of them) im not too sure what color he is though. my husband bought me the father from a pet store so no background there, and i got the mother from a breeder out of denver, co. but they shipped her in from canada, so no info there either. hes starting to look like he could possibly be a brown velvet, but im not too sure. i dont know a whole lot about mutations, so im trying to learn. he has the red/pink eyes, and his ears look pinkish, but they have a grey tint to them.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Dallas (9).jpg (71.3 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg Dallas (7).jpg (72.1 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg Dallas (3).jpg (66.3 KB, 2 views)
mcglothlin2803 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 03:08 AM
I'm not weird, I'm gifted
 
Chinchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Denmark
Age: 33
Posts: 1,530
 
First of:
You really need to stop breeding if you do not know what's in your animals. They can have all sorts of problems you do not know anything about.
Also if you do not know the basics behind the genetics, you really shouldn't breed.

And then your question:
Your male is a hetero beige.

If you are positive the dad is hetero beige, the only possible kits from a hetero beige + standard grey is hetero beige and standard grey.

TOV is a dominant mutation, so to get a brown velvet one parent needs to have this mutation, and that would mean you had a brown velvet as a dad or a black velvet as a mom.

/Pia

I apologized if my english is not correct
Owned by chinchillas since 1997
Breeding since 2005


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
<-- Check out my blog for Chinfo
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Chinchi is offline  
post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 04:04 PM Thread Starter
Adolescent Pup
 
mcglothlin2803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 34
Posts: 79
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chinchi View Post
First of:
You really need to stop breeding if you do not know what's in your animals. They can have all sorts of problems you do not know anything about.
Also if you do not know the basics behind the genetics, you really shouldn't breed.

And then your question:
Your male is a hetero beige.

If you are positive the dad is hetero beige, the only possible kits from a hetero beige + standard grey is hetero beige and standard grey.

TOV is a dominant mutation, so to get a brown velvet one parent needs to have this mutation, and that would mean you had a brown velvet as a dad or a black velvet as a mom.

well thank you for your response. i have had genetic testing done on all my chinchillas, as far as to make sure they have good genes, and they do. their isnt anything wrong with any of them. secondly i said the mom is a hetero beige, so you got that a bit mixed up, but thats ok. thirdly, i do know the basics, im just not at the top of my game when it comes to mutations.
mcglothlin2803 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 04:21 PM
Rodentologist
 
Jennicat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,941
  
Can you expand upon the "genetic testing" that you've had done on these animals? I'm unaware of any genetic tests for exotics on the market at the moment. What exactly were they tested for?

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Jennicat is offline  
post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
Adolescent Pup
 
mcglothlin2803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 34
Posts: 79
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennicat View Post
Can you expand upon the "genetic testing" that you've had done on these animals? I'm unaware of any genetic tests for exotics on the market at the moment. What exactly were they tested for?

honestly i dont know what they were for exactly. my ex-vet did the pricking of the ear to collect the blood. and said he had it sent off, for the testing, i paid $250 for each chinchilla, and now you've got me worried that he got me for my money. i dont use THAT vet anymore cause he caused my female to miscarry. i didnt know anything about it either, but when i went in for their exam, he offered and i accepted.
mcglothlin2803 is offline  
post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 04:38 PM
Rodentologist
 
Jennicat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,941
  
Genetic testing is not just a general "hey, yeah, this animal looks good", a genetic test tests for a specific thing. For example, dog breeders will often test for genetic inheritable issues that are known to the breed. They would take a sample, it would be sent to a lab, and they would receive an answer that either yes, their dog does carry the gene, or no, they don't. There's not just a general genetic awesomeness test.

It's more likely that he just had bloodwork done, which is completely valid, but really doesn't affect their breeding standing unless they're shown to be actively sick.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Jennicat is offline  
post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 04:45 PM Thread Starter
Adolescent Pup
 
mcglothlin2803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 34
Posts: 79
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennicat View Post
Genetic testing is not just a general "hey, yeah, this animal looks good", a genetic test tests for a specific thing. For example, dog breeders will often test for genetic inheritable issues that are known to the breed. They would take a sample, it would be sent to a lab, and they would receive an answer that either yes, their dog does carry the gene, or no, they don't. There's not just a general genetic awesomeness test.

It's more likely that he just had bloodwork done, which is completely valid, but really doesn't affect their breeding standing unless they're shown to be actively sick.
i did have the blood work done, im sure of that, those came back all good. but he also said that he sent the blood to the lab to check their genetics. now i dont know.
so anyways, i know my animals are all healthy, but since im not absolutely 100% possitive of their lineage i shouldn't be breeding? why is this?
mcglothlin2803 is offline  
post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 05:04 PM
Rodentologist
 
Jennicat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,941
  
Most serious problems with chinchillas have a strong genetic component. Even though their parents are fine, they may be recessively carrying genes which can result in early and unpleasant deaths for their offspring. Considering how many chinchillas there are in the world, and especially in Texas right now, why breed more chinchillas of random unknown heritage and risk that?

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Jennicat is offline  
post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 05:16 PM Thread Starter
Adolescent Pup
 
mcglothlin2803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 34
Posts: 79
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennicat View Post
Most serious problems with chinchillas have a strong genetic component. Even though their parents are fine, they may be recessively carrying genes which can result in early and unpleasant deaths for their offspring. Considering how many chinchillas there are in the world, and especially in Texas right now, why breed more chinchillas of random unknown heritage and risk that?
why do you think there are alot of chinchillas in texas?? i couldn't find anyone here that had chinchillas, therefore am getting my ebony and black velvet from kansas. there are a few breeders here, but they are all up north, im in the south. you may be right, but you may be wrong as well. i have kept 2 of my kits (ive had a total of 10+3 that arent weaned yet) from this particular pair. i keep in touch with everyone that has bought a kit from me, and nobody has had any problems. PLUS just because im not completely sure of their heritage, i offered a lifetime guarantee on their health. that way if any of the babies that i sell from this pair fall ill, and its due to genetics, something in their genes is defective, i refund them their money. i have yet to have anyone ask for a refund.
mcglothlin2803 is offline  
post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 05:50 PM
I'm not weird, I'm gifted
 
Chinchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Denmark
Age: 33
Posts: 1,530
 
But seriously. You really need to stop breeding until you know the basics.
If you do not even know how beige vs std works, how can you be sure not to make a pair that have the lethal factor?
It's not the biggest problem in the world. The embryos will die very early on. It's quite rare that an animal will be borne with the lethal factor. But in the long run mum may get sterile or even get a bad infection because of the lethal factor.

Then we have the whole teeth problem. I do not know of any test where you can tell if they have it. We (as in chinchilla people) think it is genetic, but it's not something we are completely sure about, because of the lack of research into chinchilla illnesses.
People also think that furbiting is genetic, but the question is, if this is the truth, because to be honest, it looks more something they learn from their parents.

And then you say you guarantee the animals to be healthy for their entire life, but what if they have something genetically wrong with them, and your buyers start breeding the animal they got from you?

I'm not trying to be mean, but breeding is a big responsibility, and it's not fun to see how chinchillas all over the world are being mistreated or die too early because some people just start breeding, with out knowing the most basic stuff.

/Pia

I apologized if my english is not correct
Owned by chinchillas since 1997
Breeding since 2005


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
<-- Check out my blog for Chinfo
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Chinchi is offline  
post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 06:33 PM
Resident Aquarium Nerd
 
Sasami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
Age: 28
Posts: 9,930
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcglothlin2803 View Post
why do you think there are alot of chinchillas in texas??
http://www.star-telegram.com/local/s...k=digger-topic

Among those exotics were many, many chinchillas.




~Stephanie

"We weep for a bird's cry, but not for a fish's blood. Blessed are those with a voice."


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




Sasami is offline  
post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 07:34 PM
Rodentologist
 
Jennicat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,941
  
There were several hundred, if not thousands, of chinchillas, Sasami is correct.

Just in my opinion, the money from your clients is unimportant. To me, it is unethical to risk bringing an animal into the world which may have to live with a painful and debilitating condition just so a human can enjoy having the babies. There are many, many, many chinchillas from excellent, healthy lines already in existence. There's really no need to breed chinchillas that you have no background on.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Jennicat is offline  
post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-16-2010, 08:23 PM Thread Starter
Adolescent Pup
 
mcglothlin2803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 34
Posts: 79
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chinchi View Post
But seriously. You really need to stop breeding until you know the basics.
If you do not even know how beige vs std works, how can you be sure not to make a pair that have the lethal factor?
It's not the biggest problem in the world. The embryos will die very early on. It's quite rare that an animal will be borne with the lethal factor. But in the long run mum may get sterile or even get a bad infection because of the lethal factor.

Then we have the whole teeth problem. I do not know of any test where you can tell if they have it. We (as in chinchilla people) think it is genetic, but it's not something we are completely sure about, because of the lack of research into chinchilla illnesses.
People also think that furbiting is genetic, but the question is, if this is the truth, because to be honest, it looks more something they learn from their parents.

And then you say you guarantee the animals to be healthy for their entire life, but what if they have something genetically wrong with them, and your buyers start breeding the animal they got from you?

I'm not trying to be mean, but breeding is a big responsibility, and it's not fun to see how chinchillas all over the world are being mistreated or die too early because some people just start breeding, with out knowing the most basic stuff.

i know about the lethal factor. no white with white, no black with black, i got that part down. but i've been doubting myself on his color because i found a website with a picture of what they called a brown velvet that looked just like him. i do know the basics as far as coloring goes. im doing my research on all the mutations though, so i can better understand how all the colors that i do have work. im mostly working with standards though. besides, i wouldnt have a pair that doesnt have a standard in it anyways, i dont want small poor quality kits.
mcglothlin2803 is offline  
post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-17-2010, 12:25 AM
I'm not weird, I'm gifted
 
Chinchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Denmark
Age: 33
Posts: 1,530
 
It's called "no tov/velvet with tov/velvet"

If you think a pair with no standard parent = small kit, you really do not know the basics...
And as for the quality, that's only important if you want to show.
Like I breed smaller pointy animals, because I do not like how most people breed to get baby face animals, that's really big. They haven't even been domesticated for a hundred years, but we have animals that look like bricks and weigh over 1000 grams...
I'm not saying this is bad, but it's a problem if we all breed this way.
I know this is OT, but it doesn't sound like you know that much to be honest.

And always breeding standards to mutations is not a bad thing. But doing it because you think mutations + mutations make bad animals, is just not correct.

/Pia

I apologized if my english is not correct
Owned by chinchillas since 1997
Breeding since 2005


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
<-- Check out my blog for Chinfo
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Chinchi is offline  
post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-17-2010, 10:32 PM Thread Starter
Adolescent Pup
 
mcglothlin2803's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 34
Posts: 79
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chinchi View Post
It's called "no tov/velvet with tov/velvet"

If you think a pair with no standard parent = small kit, you really do not know the basics...
And as for the quality, that's only important if you want to show.
Like I breed smaller pointy animals, because I do not like how most people breed to get baby face animals, that's really big. They haven't even been domesticated for a hundred years, but we have animals that look like bricks and weigh over 1000 grams...
I'm not saying this is bad, but it's a problem if we all breed this way.
I know this is OT, but it doesn't sound like you know that much to be honest.

And always breeding standards to mutations is not a bad thing. But doing it because you think mutations + mutations make bad animals, is just not correct.

everyone has their own opinion when it comes to chinchillas. ive had chinchillas for about 5 years now, and yes i know that i have A LOT to learn. i can accept that. but I PERSONALLY believe that it is best to keep a standard in every breeding pair, or atleast have a pair who has a standard as one of their parents. i have a mutation+mutation pair, but my males father is a standard, the female on the other hand has a mosaic and beige as the parents. again this is a matter of opinion. the more you breed mutations and breed out the standard, the smaller the kits are gonna be. just about anyone that you ask will have a different opinion, and this is mine. i have to disagree with you on the quality, i think quality is a big factor in breeding. if you dont have quality you dont have much, jmo.
mcglothlin2803 is offline  
Reply

Tags
colors, mutations


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome