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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-20-2007, 12:05 PM Thread Starter
 
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Exclamation HELP andy's missing arm fur

I know they drop fur as a defense mechanism but this is entirely different! he's missing fur on one arm and a little on his one leg. I have pix and i'm uploading them right now and will post them soon.

Any ideas on how this happened? would he chew it off? His cage is of course all safe and chin proof.

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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-20-2007, 12:25 PM
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some animals loose fur if they have a fever, or he could have eatin or rubbed it off... if the skin doesnt look irritated, and hes not acting strange... its probably nothing... my hairless rat used to groom my other rat and pull her hair out does your chinn have a roomate?

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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-20-2007, 01:05 PM Thread Starter
 
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He's acting totally normal (eating, pooping, active, etc.) The skin is just his skin color, pink and not irritated at all. And nope, no roomate for Andy, Andy's an only child
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-20-2007, 07:46 PM
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maybe he rubbed it off or chewed it to get to a really bad itch... i dont know... id wait a few days before taking him to the vet see if hair starts to grow back

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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
 
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*bump* i still need a answer from chinchilla owners
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
 
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man...no one looks at this so i've been doing my own research and this is all i've come up with...

"

CARE OF CHINCHILLAS

The chinchilla is a rodent that is closely related to the guinea pig and porcupine. The pet chinchilla's wild counterpart inhabits the Andes Mountain areas of Peru, Bolivia, Chile and Argentina. In the wild state, they live at high altitudes in rocky, barren mountainous regions. They have been bred in captivity since 1923 primarily for their pelts. Some chinchillas who were fortunate enough to have substandard furs were sold as pets or research animals. Today chinchillas are raised for both purposes; pets and pelts.

Chinchilla Laniger is the main species bred today. They tend to be fairly clean, odourless and friendly pets, but usually are shy and easily frightened. They do not make very good pets for young children, since they tend to be highly-strung and hyperactive (both the child and the pet). The fur is extremely soft and beautiful bluish grey in colour, thus leading to their popularity in the pelt industry. Current colour mutations include white, silver, beige, and black.



DIET

Commercial Chinchilla pellets are available, but they are not available through all pet shops and feed stores. When the chinchilla variety is not in stock, a standard rabbit or guinea pig pellet can be fed in its place. Chinchillas tend to eat with their hands and often throw out a lot of pellets, thus causing wastage. A pelleted formulation should constitute the majority of the animal's diet.

Timothy - or other grass hay, can be fed to chinchillas in addition to their pellets. Alfalfa hay is not recommended due to its high calcium content relative to phosphorus. Hay is a beneficial supplement to the diet for nutritional and psychological reasons. Grass hay adds additional fibre to the diet, while serving an item for the pet to chew on other than its fur. Any hay fed should be free from mould and vermin contamination.

Dried fruit and nuts are excellent treats for the pet chinchilla. Raisins tend to be a favourite treat among these animals. Fresh carrot and green vegetables can also be provided, but in moderation. Remember, these supplements to the diet should constitute less than 10% of the food intake.

Chinchillas can drink water from valve waterers or sipper-type bottles. Very careful sanitation of the water supply is necessary, since contaminated water may be a contributing factor in disease outbreaks.



HANDLING

Chinchillas are not very difficult to handle and rarely bite. Be careful when handling them, however, due to the risk of "fur slip". "Fur slip" is the patchy shedding of hair that occurs when the fur is grasped or roughly handled. To avoid this condition, always grasp the base of the tail (close to the body) with one hand, while supporting the body on your opposite forearm and against your body. Chinchillas can also be held around the thorax as done with other rodents. Although they rarely bite, they still are capable if agitated enough. In addition, and more likely, they may urinate when annoyed. As with any animal, always be in control when holding or restraining your pet to avoid injuries to either of you.

HOUSING

Chinchillas must be kept in an area that is well lit, adequately ventilated and kept cool and dry. They do not tolerate heat or humidity, and they thrive at lower temperatures, The optimal temperature is 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Wire mesh cages are typically used for chinchillas, with or without a solid floor. Glass aquariums or plastic containers can be used, but with caution due to their poor ventilation. If these containers are used, watch for the development of scruffy fur as an indication of impending problems. Wooden cages should not be used since chinchillas are noted gnawers. These animals tend to be very active and acrobatic, thus requiring a lot of space. An ideal enclosure would measure at least 6ft x 6ft x 3ft with a one foot square nest box.

Dust baths should be provided at least once or twice weekly. These must be large and deep enough to allow the chinchilla to roll over in it. Finely powdered volcanic ash is used to keep the fur clean and well groomed. Several brands of "chinchilla dust" are marketed. A home-made alternative consists of 9 parts of silver sand to 1 part of Fuller's earth. This bath should only be provided for a short time during the day, otherwise there would be a perpetual dust cloud in the cage.

Chinchillas tend not to get along well when housed together, with the female being the more aggressive gender. Breeders and furriers commonly set up polygamous colonies with one male having access to five or so females maintained in separate cages. The male has a tunnel along the back of the females cages which enables him to enter any cage at will. The females cannot pass through the tunnel because they are fitted with light-weight collars that are just a little wider than the cage opening.



BREEDING

Chinchillas will breed throughout the year, with the main breeding season being between November and May. Oestrous cycles vary from 30 to 50 days. Many female chinchillas have irregular cycles.

The female chinchilla can be quite aggressive towards the male. For this reason, males are given the opportunity to escape from the female's cage. This is accomplished by placing a collar around the female's neck and having a small exit hole that the male can climb through, but the female wearing a collar cannot. Many breeders set up several female chinchilla cages in a row with a pathway located in back allowing free access to several females by the single male (see HOUSING section); this practice is known as harem breeding. Up to 20% of all females may never breed, which often is due to incompatibility with the male. In cases such as this, changing the male may raise the conception rate.

The gestation period is 111 days on the average, with a range of 105-115 days. There are no obvious signs of impending parturition (giving birth). Most births, however, take place in the morning. Usually two babies are born, but litter size varies between one and five.





NON-INFECTIOUS CONDITIONS



Malocclusion (Slobbers)

This condition is characterised by drooling of saliva onto the fur under the chin. Other signs include inappetance, sores in the mouth, and loss of fur under the chin The underlying cause is overgrowth of the molars (cheek teeth). Mineral imbalances as well as poor dental alignment lead to overgrown and maloccluded teeth. Temporary treatment involves clipping of the affected teeth and proper mineral supplementation. Providing wood or mineral blocks for the chinchilla to chew may aid in prevention, but many cases have a genetic basis.



Fur Slip

As mentioned in the section on HANDLING, chinchillas often lose patches of fur when roughly handled. Another common cause is fighting among the chinchillas. This condition does not injure the pet, but ruins the pelt of animals raised for fur.



Barbering / Fur Chewing

Barbering is the condition where a chinchilla chews on its own or another chinchilla’s fur resulting in a rough, moth-eaten appearing coat. Some of the underlying causes of this behaviour include boredom, dirty fur, dietary imbalances and hereditary factors. This condition is a serious problem in the pelt industry. Providing the animals with chew toys as well as selective breeding often aid in decreasing the incidence within a colony.

" Chinchillas

any comments or agreement? I think Andy must have been bored at some point? He easily looses interest in his toys and i have to switch them around and/or buy new ones None of which happened while he was at the babysitters for a month then i didn't think to do it when i got him home thinking that being back home was intertaining enough.
Fear not, i bought him a pumic block thing last nite and another shelf for his cage oooOOOooo
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 08:23 PM
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at least its an easy fix it sounds like sorry i couoldnt help more i dont have a chinchilla

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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 08:36 PM Thread Starter
 
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It's ok. Thanks though

i just wish *cough cough* the chinchilla owners would give me their "two cents"
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 09:06 PM
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It could be chewing, could be fungus, hard to say. The only way to know if it's fungus for sure is a trip to the vet. You could try putting some antifungal powder (active ingredient tolnaftate) in the dust bath for a few days, it probably wouldn't hurt. It isn't the usual place for fungus to show up though ...

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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 09:13 PM Thread Starter
 
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yea i might have to go grab some of that. I looked at his arm today (it's been 4 days now since i SAW it...doesn't mean it's been 4 days since it's happened seems how you have to look at him from a certain angle to even see it b/c his other fur covers it up.)
but it looks like his hair is growing back slightly
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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 09:38 PM
 
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well if he did chew it off and is acting like this maybe he wants a friend
Just guesses i have no idea about chinchillas though
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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 09:43 PM Thread Starter
 
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Andy has lived alone all his life and the likelyhood of him rejecting a friend is high, plus i don't have the room to do that Or i would def. try it or even try him a girlfriend but my apt is too small
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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-24-2007, 10:01 PM
 
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well he's probably fine and try not to worry too much
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alfalfa hay, breeding season, chew toy, chew toys, chinchilla pellets, dried fruit, dust bath, dust baths, gestation period, grass hay, guinea pig, hairless rat, nest box, pet shop, pet shops, separate cages, wire mesh


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