Scruffing a p dog for biting. Would it work? - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 01:13 AM Thread Starter
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Scruffing a p dog for biting. Would it work?

I was wondering if a quick Scruffing would be a good discipline for a p dog after a bite. I know most people say that you should simply cage the animal immediately after a bite, but I believe biting is a very serious offense which requires a bit more of a serious disciplinary action. Nothing abusive, just a little firm. What do you think? Thank you for your thoughts.
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 06:50 AM
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 09:19 AM
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To me, it doesn't sound like a good idea at all. Prairie dogs have a very long memory, and learn quickly. After once or twice, you will likely find them ready for your attempt to scruff, and risk either get bit even worse, or find yourself chasing them around the house to get away from you. Then you will likely end up having difficulty picking them up during normal times, because they will fear being scruffed every time your hand comes near. I can honestly say I made many of these mistakes when I got my first prairie dog, many years ago when there really wasn't a lot of information out there on caring for them. I kept trying to treat her like other animals I had experience with, like hamsters or ferrets, but it just never worked.

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 11:00 AM Thread Starter
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Ravnos, thank you for your reply! What would you suggest a person do if they are bitten and the p dog cage is not available to place her in. Biting just can not be tolerated. Prairie dogs being such social, family oriented animals MUST have some sort of disciplinary tactic for individuals within the collany who break the rules or are defient. I would really like to hear what others are doing and if their techniques are successful. Thank you for your thoughts.
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-04-2011, 01:48 PM
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first of all why is it biting needs to be the first question, are you forcing handling?
meaning is it biting to get away? or is it biting for curiosity?

If its biting to be released you need to change your handling technique. Put it down before it gets sick of you and bites. If its biting for being curious then tell it no and ignore it for a while. each time it bites.

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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-18-2011, 07:41 PM
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What do you mean by scruffing? Sorry but I really don't know what that means.

I remember with my other pdogs in the past I would flick (with my finger) them on the nose when they bit and would tell them NO!

I mean I would not flick them hard but would make sure they knew that hard biting was not at all acceptable.

This is what I am doing with my new pdog currently and hopefully it will curb any hard biting.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2011, 11:34 AM
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With my PDs they have bitten me for 3 reasons:

1: When they were scared of me as a new owner
2: When they are being handled and they don't want to be
3: They give little exploratory nips

I've found the best way to deal with these are as follows:

1: Immediately make a loud nouse (no etc.) and place them in a dark box or bin. It should be tall enough so they can't jump out. Leave them there alone for 5-10 mins and then put them back in the cage. Isolation is something PDs are hate more than anything and will quickly teach them not to bite. Even now when my PDs gets agressive, I can put my finger in their mouths and they will move away; they know what would happen if they bit me.

2: Learn theid body language. PDs are very willfully animals and still only a few generations away from being wild. If they want to be put down, do it. If you fight it, you'll always get bitten.

3: Just give them a quick no and a tap on the nose. Physical pain just pisses prairie dogs off, but a quick tap just reminds them that thats something you don't want bitten. Whether it's you or your clothes.

I would never recommend any sort of pain reponse, prairie dogs do not respond well to it at all. It'll just make them trust you less.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-22-2012, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whoopty View Post
With my PDs they have bitten me for 3 reasons:

1: When they were scared of me as a new owner
2: When they are being handled and they don't want to be
3: They give little exploratory nips

I've found the best way to deal with these are as follows:

1: Immediately make a loud nouse (no etc.) and place them in a dark box or bin. It should be tall enough so they can't jump out. Leave them there alone for 5-10 mins and then put them back in the cage. Isolation is something PDs are hate more than anything and will quickly teach them not to bite. Even now when my PDs gets agressive, I can put my finger in their mouths and they will move away; they know what would happen if they bit me.

2: Learn theid body language. PDs are very willfully animals and still only a few generations away from being wild. If they want to be put down, do it. If you fight it, you'll always get bitten.

3: Just give them a quick no and a tap on the nose. Physical pain just pisses prairie dogs off, but a quick tap just reminds them that thats something you don't want bitten. Whether it's you or your clothes.

I would never recommend any sort of pain reponse, prairie dogs do not respond well to it at all. It'll just make them trust you less.

This is soo right on! I used to flick my prairie dogs hard on the nose until I finally realized it never helped. Prairie dogs are so stubborn that pain just makes them madder. I put my PD's in a barren, small carrier when they bite or scratch.
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