Three Reasons for Banning the Private Possession of Exotic Animals - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-30-2002, 04:38 PM Thread Starter
Fertile Myrtle
 
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Three Reasons for Banning the Private Possession of Exotic Animals

Exotic animals -- lions, tigers, wolves, bears, reptiles, non-human primates -- belong in their natural habitat and not in the hands of private individuals as "pets." By their very nature, these animals are wild and potentially dangerous and, as such, do not adjust well to a captive environment.

API is working with state and local governments to ensure the safety of these animals, and in the process, protect the communities from the safety and health risks these animals pose when in the hands of private individuals.



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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-31-2002, 01:24 PM Thread Starter
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I just thought it would help to know the their reasons and what we may be up against!

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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-02-2002, 10:39 PM
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ha ha too funny, I have a client at work who is an english teacher... Well he came in last night, and we started chin chattin, he asked to see my website.
So I sent him over to it, he comes back, and I asked what he thinks.....

"Well, it's absolutely FULL of Grammatical errors,"

Then he goes on in some proffesional gibberish about how a potential chin client does not want to wade thrrough a maze of typos , misplaced punctuation and long written sentences, and that it would most deffinately affect my business...

I kinda laughed... While I agree that you should always try to perfect your english on documents, I hardly think it is something that will cause a potential chin buyer to go,


"Gee, I really wanted a chinchilla, but that comma is in entirely the wrong place, so forget it!"

I informed him that not too many english proffessors are in the market for a hearty chin page to read... anyways this turned into a HUGE argument.. I mean litterally! He told me to go to H*LL!!!!

Like WHAT?!
It's a WEBPAGE!! Anyways, it reminded me of Tortis! LMAO
 
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-05-2002, 07:39 PM
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I really don't understand what is so bad about keeping exotics as pets and raising them if you are able, for that matter. Most of the exotics I have researched show a big difference in life span between living in the wild and captive bred (pet) animals. I believe because they receive proper diet and are well cared for because they are loved and respected by the owners. They don't have to contend with predators or scarce food sources. Some animals would be extinct if it wasn't for captive breeding and the love for the species not to mention the many hours they put in taking care of them.
 
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-10-2002, 04:34 PM
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Sharmon , you are right about the lifespan. I foster mostly wild oppossums for release and it just kills me that in Canada the life expectency is 1-3 yrs, 3 being very old and uncommon. In captivity they live to be 10yrs, I released over 25 possums last year alone to live prob only another year to year and a half. But by release time they are anxious to get going and very seldom look back. Although that is prob because we take special care to make sure that they do not bond to us, hence becoming a problem once released. Release time is definitely bitter-sweet

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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-10-2002, 05:51 PM
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Poor possum, that must be soo hard!
 
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 02-10-2002, 08:32 PM
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People also forget that the reason many people raise and even try to breed exotics is to keep the species from becoming extinct. There aren't enough zoos to keep a population growing and think of all of the people who rehabilitate wild and exotics.

However, I think it is a good thing to deter someone that doesn't really know what they are getting into and would probably not want to deal with it once they were in the situtation.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 09:17 AM
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"Non-domesticated felines, such as lions, tigers, leopards, cougars and ocelots, are commonly held as "pets." These exotic animals are cute and cuddly when they are young but have the potential to seriously injure or kill people and other animals as they mature. Adult exotic felines weigh anywhere between 300 to 500 pounds depending on the species, and are incapable of being "domesticated." Even an animal that appears to be friendly and loving can attack unsuspecting individuals. "

My great uncle had a lion he saved for almost 25 yrs and died of old age. I played with it as a child. Never hurt fleas. It was declawed for safety but was the funnest pet he had. It played with his dogs and never hurt them and one was a terri-poo. It was never taught to kill or hunt and from the time it was little was taught to be gentle. It lived in the house and took walks just like his dogs. Mind you it loved to pop basketballs but so does my friends germannshepard.
 
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 07:12 PM
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I do agree that he was an exception but it does show that the possibility is there.
All animals are unperdictable and I've seen a horse leave someone in a comma from kicking them in the head. Does this mean that horses should be banned or bulls are very dangerous but still kept on farms.
The point was that eventhough every animal has its "flaws" as a pet doesn't mean they should pick out exotic animals.
"By their very nature, exotic animals are dangerous creatures."
By their nature all animals are dangerous. The smallest animal can be dangerous. Some just less then others.
I do agree there needs to be regulations to protect the animals and to make sure proper care and safety issues are addressed but to bann them outright I don't really agree with.
Sorry it is just my opinion I guess I'm kind of tainted my great uncle was a vet for a zoo and I grew up around all kinds of animals. I just knew the rules when I went to visit at work. I guess it gives me a mixed feeling on the subject. I do agree that some exotics aren't just for anyone to own.
 
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