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post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-21-2005, 12:08 AM Thread Starter
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Unhappy adoption declined

I have two rabbits that I had spayed and neutered. They live in an oversized hutch with an enclosed run, and I allow them 4 hours out of their hutch in a free range area each day for playtime. I also take them to the vet for regular check ups. I went to a shelter to ask about adopting another pair of rabbits, but was told I would not be allowed to adopt because my rabbits are outside. I was told that the shelter believes that outdoor rabbits get forgotten and neglected and so they only adopted rabbits as house pets. The shelter had other pets, dogs, cats, etc. that were neglected house pets but I guess they don't think that can happen to house rabbits. I know they euthanize some of their rabbits because they can't place all of them. I went to another rescue organization and adopted two cats instead. Has anyone else had this problem?
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post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-21-2005, 01:09 AM
 
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I used to work in a shelter and yes, they can be strict sometimes. However, for the amount of times a "good" owner is declined, there are 10 "bad" owners that are declined for the same reason. It's not a great situation but our rules stuck, no matter what. Though, I also worked in a no-kill shelter so we knew the animals had a forever home even if they were never adopted.
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post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-21-2005, 09:29 AM
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Alot of shelters have the *inside only* rule. Unfortunalty there is not much you can do, save support a different shelter.

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post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-22-2005, 05:36 AM
 
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Sorry that your adoption was declined.. Its a shame they have the house only rule, mine all live outside in a large shed, and have the best life I can give them.. Congrats on your cats though!
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post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-22-2005, 10:37 AM
 
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That's similar to what happened to me. Before I adopted Harry I was planning on adopting a Jersey Woolie and I found one in a shelter not so far away. However, when I e-mailed them and told them I would be keeping the rabbit in a shed outdoors, they proceded to tell me that I abuse my bunny and that they would never give their rabbit to me. Well, I went looking more and found Harry and couldn't be happier. When one door closes, a better one opens.
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post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-22-2005, 12:00 PM
 
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im sorry the adoption was declined.
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post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-23-2005, 12:54 AM Thread Starter
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The shelters sure have a lot of information on how rabbits can die outside, but when it comes to how rabbits can live happily and safely outside, they seem pretty clueless! I wonder if they are even allowed to give out that kind of information? They could sure help a lot more rabbits if they educate people on outdoor rabbits. I just think that when people know better, they do better, and not everyone can keep their rabbits in the house. I would have been happy to allow an inspection and address their concerns, and offer references, but that was not an option.
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post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-23-2005, 08:17 AM
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The way I see it, when properly done, rabbits can be even happier outside than inside since people can build them larger hutches outside than they can inside.

I don't see a problem keeping rabbits outside as long as they are given good protection from the cold and heat, ample hay and food and their cages are kept clean.

I can understand keeping one of the dwarf varieties inside, but when you get to the breeds like the Flemish Giant, well ... It's hard to house them in a house.

Point in case--my husband's friend has a Flemish giant and they lived in an apartment. Since she has no yard, Pipsa (the rabbit) has her own ROOM. She needs that much space!

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post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-23-2005, 05:15 PM Thread Starter
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Maybe what some of us should do is start some new threads. We can ask questions like; Do outside rabbits have antics? How can you tell when an outside rabbit is happy? How do you prevent preditor attack? How do you prevent fly strike? etc. I wonder what kind of responce we would get? I think it is sad when a child is told by his parents he can't keep his rabbit in the house anymore, and then he can't sleep because he visited some web site that explained all the different ways his rabbit is going to die a terrible death.
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post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-23-2005, 06:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pihlaja
The way I see it, when properly done, rabbits can be even happier outside than inside since people can build them larger hutches outside than they can inside.

I don't see a problem keeping rabbits outside as long as they are given good protection from the cold and heat, ample hay and food and their cages are kept clean.

I can understand keeping one of the dwarf varieties inside, but when you get to the breeds like the Flemish Giant, well ... It's hard to house them in a house.

Point in case--my husband's friend has a Flemish giant and they lived in an apartment. Since she has no yard, Pipsa (the rabbit) has her own ROOM. She needs that much space!
I COMPLETELY agree with you! Harry has become soo much more cheerful since he went outside. Let's see those shelters trying to explain that...
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post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-24-2005, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Millimi
I COMPLETELY agree with you! Harry has become soo much more cheerful since he went outside. Let's see those shelters trying to explain that...
And, I've never met an animal that didn't enjoy at least SOME fresh air from the outdoors!

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post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-24-2005, 07:46 PM
 
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If your inspection had been done that would have been great for you, but overall alot of outside rabbits do NOT have the great lifestyles many of us describe as providing. It seems the majority are in rather small hutches outdoors and noit let out THAT frequently. There may not even be nesting (cubby holes) available. For these reasons I am glad for the shelter's strictness, although I agree individual exceptions for people with good outdoor set-ups should be allowed. It doesn't seem very practical however that the shelter would go "inspect" individual cases because I bet you 15 out of 20 would say, "Sure our outdoor rabbit area is just GREAT!" and...thats 15 theyd have to check, maybe find 5 of really good quality? Im not trying to shoot you down but I think its important to remember the rules are there to protect the animals even if some well-meaning people with great homes for them might get left out. They are looking at the over all picture. I do hope its a "no death" shelter though. Well thats my piece.
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post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-24-2005, 09:52 PM Thread Starter
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I guess I just have a different set of values. I believe in education, not confrontation. If the shelters were to recruite outdoor rabbit people who knew how to do it right, to educate those who did not know how to do it right, can you imagine how many more rabbits could be saved? Treating caring, responcible, outdoor rabbit owners like abusers is not good for the shelters, it is not good for the house rabbit organizations, or the poor rabbits that are euthanized. Those people that are looking to adopt rabbits to put in little cages are just going to buy rabbits from breeders and the abuse will continue. Wouldn't it be better to work with them at the shelters on providing a better life for their rabbits? And not everyone is going to put there rabbits in the house, nor should everyone. When the kids are fighting and playing loud music all the time, rabbits can get pretty stressed. When someone walks into a shelter, it is a great opportunity to educate, why chase them away?
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post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 06:35 AM
 
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I agree that shelters shouldn't chase people away but they have most likely had lots of reasons in the past to think that outdoor housing may not be the way to go.

I have eight indoor bunnies & eight "outdoor" bunnies. The outdoor bunnies though are divided between living in a HUGE outside enclosure & a large brick studio so they all have heaps of room to run around & I know they are safe. However, this situation is temporary & I wouldn't want these little guys to live like this permanently (we've just run out of bedrooms inside!). I will be looking for new homes for these little guys in the near future and my policy will be to only adopt them out to people who will house them inside. That's just me though as I want to know they will be safe from predators, insects, weather, etc.

In Australia we don't have a myxo vaccine (only the calici vaccine). This just causes more panic for me in the thought that outside bunnies (if not housed somewhere bug proof) can end up getting this horrible disease. The other thing about my outdoor bunnies is that I don't get to interact with them nearly as much as my indoor bunnies & I wish I could. If you don't see them constantly, how do you know they are happy & how can you monitor their health??
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post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 04:58 PM Thread Starter
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My rabbits are outside because I have other pets in the house that would harrass them. I agree that they are not as friendly when they are outside, but they are a pair so they don't get lonely and I check on them three times a day. Also, the neighbors like to visit them. When I got my rabbits, I was not looking for pets. I learned of some house rabbits that were being abused. I whent to the home and I talked the owner into allowing me to adopt them. I guess that is why I get so upset when people assume that because they are outside, they are neglected. They were not socialized and the shelter had many rabbits and so I kept them. I think that the biggest problem with keeping rabbits outside in the U.S. is the lack of information, and hutches sold in pet stores are too small. In the book, "Why Does My Rabbit...?" by Anne McBride, there is a section on maggots that gives wonderful ideas on how to prevent fly strike. Also, mosqutoe netting can be placed over hutches for added protection. I admire you for taking in so many rabbits. I am at my limit of pets now because my vet bills have just gotten too high, and I refuse to take in animals unless I can provide them with health care.
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