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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-26-2009, 03:31 AM Thread Starter
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Red face Knowledge and experiance about Flemish giants wanted!!

Hi all, So My partner and I are wanting to get a Flemish Giant as a family pet, We have 2 small children (3yrs and 7months). With this going to be our first time owning one theres abit of controversy (sp) over what Sex would be better. The majority saying Male as the females tend to get Aggressive, afew people saying it doesnt matter what sex you get its all about the time you spend with the rabbit and the attention it gets and most recently Males being the aggressive ones as opposed (sp) to the females. So we were planning on getting a Male, only now im a little confused. Either way we are planning on getting our Flemish fixed. Please help!! Your knowledge and experiance is very much appreciated!!
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-26-2009, 05:36 AM
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Females typically are more territorial than males, but if they are spayed this will resolve most of their hormonal aggression issues.

Quite personally, as a rabbit rescuer, a rabbit is not a good choice for a family pet for small children especially. Rabbits do not enjoy being picked up, and will kick and scratch quite fiercely when they are (this is not a matter of upbringing, by the way, though some tolerate it better than others, it is an instict tied to the fact that they're prey animals).

In addition, a rabbit can literally kick so hard while being picked up that it will break its own back. A lot of rabbits also don't typically like being petted in the way that a dog or a cat would be petted, they prefer everything on their own terms.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-26-2009, 07:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennicat View Post
Females typically are more territorial than males, but if they are spayed this will resolve most of their hormonal aggression issues.

Quite personally, as a rabbit rescuer, a rabbit is not a good choice for a family pet for small children especially. Rabbits do not enjoy being picked up, and will kick and scratch quite fiercely when they are (this is not a matter of upbringing, by the way, though some tolerate it better than others, it is an instict tied to the fact that they're prey animals).

In addition, a rabbit can literally kick so hard while being picked up that it will break its own back. A lot of rabbits also don't typically like being petted in the way that a dog or a cat would be petted, they prefer everything on their own terms.
I agree. Sunny never lets me pick her up. She'll only be picked up a certain way, but me being as clumzy as I am I leave it up to my mom or my sister. And those Giants are big bunnies! Sunny is a californian, smaller then a Giant and she kicks like a maniac sometimes! My sister get's scratched up alot. So i'd think about that a second time. You don't want your kids getting hurt picking up the big guy. And you don't want him getting hurt from flipping out of your hands and potentially getting hurt.

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-26-2009, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennicat View Post
Females typically are more territorial than males, but if they are spayed this will resolve most of their hormonal aggression issues.

Quite personally, as a rabbit rescuer, a rabbit is not a good choice for a family pet for small children especially. Rabbits do not enjoy being picked up, and will kick and scratch quite fiercely when they are (this is not a matter of upbringing, by the way, though some tolerate it better than others, it is an instict tied to the fact that they're prey animals).

In addition, a rabbit can literally kick so hard while being picked up that it will break its own back. A lot of rabbits also don't typically like being petted in the way that a dog or a cat would be petted, they prefer everything on their own terms.
Agreed, agreed, agreed! In the case of dwarf rabbits, it's actually the females that are more docile, and the males are more aggressive. But in general animal psyche, the males it the calmer one, and the female is the more aggressive one.

Although, apparently lop-ears, no matter what the gender, I've heard to be pretty docile and they actually enjoy being cuddled.

Why do you want a rabbit? And even then - rabbits are social creatures, they prefer having a buddy. Rabbits require veggies, and a constant supply of hay - are you willing/able to supply those?

You could try making a post on the forum somewhere maybe in the "General Animal" thread, and specify what you want out of a pet, and see what people come up with for what type of pet they think would fulfill those requirements?

The general idea about rabbits is that they're cuddly little creatures with poofy tails that love being snuggled. ....SO not the case. I liken them to cats. They're very clean, and they rule YOU, you don't rule them, Lol. If your rabbit says, "I want my veggies NOW!" you are obligated to oblige at any cost, or your rabbit might kill you in your sleep, lol.

That said... I agree that a rabbit, even a Flemish Giant, may not be the best choice for a household with kids. As well-educated as kids may be with pets around, sometimes... they just can't resist but to pull a tail or an ear, just to see what the reaction is.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-27-2009, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlickeringHope View Post
Agreed, agreed, agreed! In the case of dwarf rabbits, it's actually the females that are more docile, and the males are more aggressive. But in general animal psyche, the males it the calmer one, and the female is the more aggressive one.

Although, apparently lop-ears, no matter what the gender, I've heard to be pretty docile and they actually enjoy being cuddled.

Why do you want a rabbit? And even then - rabbits are social creatures, they prefer having a buddy. Rabbits require veggies, and a constant supply of hay - are you willing/able to supply those?

You could try making a post on the forum somewhere maybe in the "General Animal" thread, and specify what you want out of a pet, and see what people come up with for what type of pet they think would fulfill those requirements?

The general idea about rabbits is that they're cuddly little creatures with poofy tails that love being snuggled. ....SO not the case. I liken them to cats. They're very clean, and they rule YOU, you don't rule them, Lol. If your rabbit says, "I want my veggies NOW!" you are obligated to oblige at any cost, or your rabbit might kill you in your sleep, lol.

That said... I agree that a rabbit, even a Flemish Giant, may not be the best choice for a household with kids. As well-educated as kids may be with pets around, sometimes... they just can't resist but to pull a tail or an ear, just to see what the reaction is.
I agree.
Our rabbit Sunny can get pricey sometimes. She gets unlimited access to hay - then theres her food, toys, her cage, and toe nail clippings at the vet.. Her cage is a bit small but we let her have free access to the house until it's time to go to sleep.

I do think a bun would be good for kids, but not small kids. - and not an aggressive, big one. They're not what they look like. Sometimes they can be little fluffy cuddly best friends but other times they can be aggressive. If your kids poke them in the wrong place they can turn around and bite their finger.. rabbit bites (atleast Sunny's) are very painful sometimes.

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-27-2009, 10:22 AM
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I suppose it depends on the actual rabbit its self, not all larger breeds are agressive and all aren't docile etc but i've known people here and there who have owned flemish giants and on the whole they have been good, one in particular would love being stroked and would close his eyes whilst you were stroking him

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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-27-2009, 12:18 PM
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I agree with everyone else...
Rabbits are GREAT pets (deffinatly my favorite!), but only for the right people. If you really want a rabbit, you should wait a few year untill your kids are older, so they will understand better what they can and cannot do to bunny, and will have more respect for it. Little kids dont understand why bunny doesnt like being picked up, or why it will scratch/bite them. Rabbits can also be VERY stessed out in a house with loud screaming kids, and that can make them even more aggressive. And with 2 young children, Im sure you have their toys, blankies, and stuffed animals everywhere... Most rabbits will happily destroy and some times eat anything at their level, so small toys laying around will be very dangerous for the bun, and Im sure your kids wont be very happy when they see Barbies (or G.I. Joes) head is missing!



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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-29-2009, 01:03 PM
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I'd love to have a giant breed rather than these little boys I have, only because I woudln't have to worry about our dogs somehow getting in the room!
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-29-2009, 02:15 PM
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Yes - rabbits will try and make you a new wardrobe too.

....

.....

Ok, well, they will try and destroy it. I have a pillow case that was sitting out on the bed(with the pillow in it) and my Netherland Dwarf Flicker(sadly; he died ) was running around my room, hopped on the bed, and tore into my pillow case. It's a reminder to me of him now, and I think about him every time I put my head on that pillow case.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-30-2009, 11:16 AM
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to be honest it matters more how you treat the bun and how you care for it rather than the sex, all bunnies are different.
and also spaying/neutering will put a stop to behaviour such as spraying ( not so good when you have a house bunny) : )
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-30-2009, 11:19 AM
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consider a french lop, they are still a giant breed but are generally speaking very very friendly bunnies, anyone with a french lop will tell you how relaxed and friendly they are they think they are puppies im sure!! ( obv not all bunnies are the same but generally speaking)

be aware though that bunnies are not a pet for young children especially if you are a novice bunny owner.

Last edited by pumpkin42; 09-30-2009 at 11:23 AM.
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