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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2010, 01:05 PM Thread Starter
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Preventing flystrike?

Is there anyway to avoid flystrike with rabbits? Like, so your pet would never have to go through it?
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2010, 01:15 PM
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Keeping them inside.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2010, 05:25 PM
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Yeah, keeping them inside would definatly be the best option.
But, if you cant keep them inside, keep their hutches VERY clean! Scoop out their corners or litterboxes at least once a day, so there isnt poo sitting around for flys to lay eggs in. When Smudge was outdoors, I always completely power washed his hutch once a week.


And even more importantly, keep your bunny clean! Make sure to keep it well groomed at mat free, and make sure its butt is especially clean. If you have an older rabbit that has issues cleaning himself, you will want to clean off his butt with a warm washcloth every day (make sure your bun is completely dry before he goes back out though).


So you basicly just need to be a little OCD with cleaning LOL. Keeping a clean cage and bunny will definatly keep him alot safer.



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"For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older than ours they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear.They are not brethen, they are not underlings; they are other nations caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth."
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-12-2010, 05:42 PM
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^ Agreed with Jess above. My rabbit goes outside daily during the warmer months(4 x 8 ft hutch on wheels), and it's often out there for hours. I bring her in at night. I keep the litter box perfectly clean, and she doesn't have any problems.

'Cuz even flies can get inside your home and do their business there.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-13-2010, 12:11 AM
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I guess flies inside wouldnt be as much a problem since they just fly around and go on. Unless there's tainted food or something interesting to the flies to make them wan to stay , like an unclean pen/cage, then I never had a problem. Plus I have the advantage of Hunter Kitteh who prowls the house in search of little edibles ^-^
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-13-2010, 06:18 AM
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Plus, the conditions need to be right for flystrike to occur. If you've got a clean bunny in a clean pen, even if there are flies, there's nowhere for them to lay their eggs. You'll typically notice sooner inside if there's a place where flystrike is likely because you're living there with the bunnies -- the smell with be quite noticeable!

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2010, 10:33 AM Thread Starter
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Ok, thanks for the advice My old bunny Jack got flystike and he was gone within 48 hours i did keep his hutch and him clean but i guess it wasn't OCD enough, it was so horrible it almost puts me off getting another bunny again but i know somewhere down the line i'll get another one, probably when i get my own place
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-25-2010, 09:33 PM
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If you must keep your rabbits outside, you must take precautions. Many outdoor hutches don't allow for enough ventilation to keep the hutch dry enough to discourage flies. In the book, "Why Does My Rabbit . . . ?" the author Anne Mcbride tells where to drill holes in hutches to provide adequate ventaltion. Some people like to cover their hutches with mosquito netting to prevent flystrike. One product which should offer some protection is "Perma-Guard" or food grade diatomaceus earth. It is used by sheep and livestock owners to prevent flystrike. Coat your rabbit's food pellets with this product, which looks like flour, and it will deworm your rabbits. Because diatomaceus earth comes out in feces, it helps to keep flies away, and prevent magots. I don't know that this product is 100% fool proof when it comes to preventing flystrike, but then neither is keeping rabbits inside 100% fool proof.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-25-2010, 09:46 PM
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keeping the hutch really really big allowing the bunny to run around alot is good, the poo won't pile then.

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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-25-2010, 11:03 PM
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Diatomaceous Earth works by slicing through the exoskeletons of parasites. But flies are a fair bit more meatier than parasitic worms, so I'm not sure Diatomaceous Earth would work against flies. You also need to be careful with handling Diatomaceous Earth - as it's VERY dusty. It does the job for de-worming, but you can't expose yourself, or your pet to it everyday. 2 - 3 times a week max, I think, but not even humans can handle its dust every day, nor should they.

Diatomaceous Earth are actually fossilized sea plants. Breathing in the dust doesn't *technically* do any harm, but it's recommended to not be breathing it in every day.

In fact, I think a better suggestion would be to sprinkle the DE36 directly into the litter box, or wherever they do their business. Not in the food bowl - rabbits shove their faces into their food bowl, and I imagine the DE36 would risk causing more of a harm in the food bowl and on the food, than in the litter box.

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post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 03:54 AM Thread Starter
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I would have liked to keep him indoors but i wasn't allowed, my Mum doesn't like any other animal in the house other than the cats lol which is a shame as it gets pretty **** cold in the Winter down here.
I'll have to remember the Diatomaceous Earth for next time, i would take any precaution not to go through that again
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post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 04:19 AM
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Do NOT buy Diatomaceous Earth from a pool place - they add chemicals to it. Check out your local Garden Centers for DE36. Also make sure it's Food-grade.

Rabbits actually do remarkably well outside. The only thing that's concerning is their water bottles freezing. That's the constant major issue. Other than that, they have thick fur coats that keep them warm, and blankets and other such stuff can be added to ensure that they're warm. As long as they have somewhere to go in their hutches that keep them away from the blunt of the wind and other elements, they do perfectly well outside. Their cousins, the Cotton-Tails, are outside all the time in winter, and they do just fine.

In fact, I'm sure your rabbit probably prefers being outside to inside. So long as your rabbit stills gets attention. Rabbits adore being outside; and the natural Vitamin D from the sun is REALLY good for them. Indoor rabbits lack the natural Vitamin D from the sun.
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post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 05:41 AM
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I would be more concerned with heat than cold. We get probably over a hundred calls every year from people who's outdoor bunnies have succumbed to heat stroke. Sometimes even the added heat can simply make it easier for them to be scared to death/have heart attacks because of the extra stress that it places on the body.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 05:04 PM
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Yeah, heat is more of a problem. To help with it, you can fill milk jugs with water and freeze them (make sure not to fill them all the way, since water expands) and place them in your hutch for some "air conditioning".


For winter, order one of these: Heating Pad. I used it for Smudge when I used to keep him outside, and it works really well. Since Smudge doesnt need it anymore, Ive been using it at night for Wink to keep him nice and cozy.



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"For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older than ours they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear.They are not brethen, they are not underlings; they are other nations caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth."
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post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-26-2010, 07:53 PM
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Yeah - is your rabbit's hutch shaded by a tree? If not, you're gonna want other ways to cool it off. Maybe pick up a stone slab at your local hardware store, and place it in her cage, so she can hop on that if she's overheated.
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