Spraying problem...please HELP!! - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
Rabbit Discussion All things floppy.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 10:21 AM Thread Starter
Part of the Pack
 
Sandra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Ottawa, Ont. Canada
Age: 44
Posts: 368
 
Spraying problem...please HELP!!


I changed my bunny's (4 months old) environment from a cage to a bigger playpen that is in my living room. He as been biting the playpen and pushing it a few time a day. Now I noticed that he's spraying (or peeing) on soft stuff and not in his litter box. So I took his blankets out of the playpen. Is my bunny trying to tell me something or it's a normal behaviour? Will getting him neuter fix that problem?
Sandra is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 12:11 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
Bunnies start having major hormones around that age, and spraying urine is normal. They also don't have the best litter box habits when they aren't spayed/neutered. You should definitely get that done. Talk to a rabbit experienced vet and see how old he needs to be before they can perform the surgery. My female was spayed when she was about 3 or 4 months old. Her hormones were raging before the surgery and she was spraying urine and pooping everywhere. After she was spayed, she was back to her normal litter box trained self.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 12:14 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
Here are some sites with more info:

www.rabbit.org

http://www.rabbitnetwork.org/articles/basics.shtml


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 12:20 PM
Part of the Pack
 
Cheetara03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: South Carolina
Age: 38
Posts: 275
 
My bunny hasnt been spraying but obviously, by my long post, HAS been chewing on the cage. I havent gotten him neutered yet (we are going this week) so I dont know what changes to expect! I was told neutering him will make him calmer so Im hoping he will stop biting the cage.

Neutering your bunny will only help. There are many positive side to neutering such as a longer life! Thats why im doing it. Even if his behavior doesnt stop at least he will be healthier.

Good luck and keep us posted.
Cheetara03 is offline  
post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 12:22 PM Thread Starter
Part of the Pack
 
Sandra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Ottawa, Ont. Canada
Age: 44
Posts: 368
 
Thanks Bubba! My vet is a bunny vet and he told me about not having 100% chances of waking up after surgery and I am worrying about. I was hoping I wouldnt have to put my bunny into that stress. From what I have been noticing, I'm not really sure its spraying. Because I dont see urine on the wall, it's on the floor. So I had to take his bed out as well a a blanket...too much work to keep on washing it. Do you think that my bunny is trying to tell me something by peeing on the floor?
Sandra is offline  
post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 12:29 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
If you still have chewing issues after he is neutered, try putting him on a set schedule. They are major creatures of habit so if you usually let them out at a certain time and then don't one day, or if you change their schedule around, they will most likely chew the bars. I have found that keeping my rabbits on a set schedule (as much as I can) greatly reduces the chewing or stops it completely. They know what to expect so they don't try to get out of their cage when its not play time. Neutering will definitely help though and like Cheetara said, is healthier for the bunny.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 05:01 PM
Tarzan Mama of Two
 
RSbunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The land down under!
Age: 36
Posts: 7,329
       
Sandra Steph and cheetera are right! Your bunny won't be able to be neutered until he is 6 months old though and if your vet is telling you that he may not wake up then look for another vet. It is true that rabbits are sensitive to anaesthetic but a vet that is experienced with rabbits should be able to do your bun with no complications. Not all vets are experts on rabbits so it might be wise to go elsewhere for this one.

Too lazy to even think of a siggy
RSbunny is offline  
post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 05:27 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandra
Thanks Bubba!
Hopefully you don't think my real name is Bubba.

I agree with Carmen. Find a different vet. Spaying and neutering bunnies is safe if done by a rabbit experienced vet. All bunnies in rescues are required to be fixed upon adoption, and its a requirement in many shelters as well. If it wasn't safe, so many rabbits wouldn't be spayed and neutered. I'd definitely try to find someone else because I guarantee that both you and your bunny will be happier once its done!


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 05:28 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
Oh and I just wanted to add that even if he's not spraying urine, neutering will greatly improve his litterbox habits.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 05:44 PM Thread Starter
Part of the Pack
 
Sandra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Ottawa, Ont. Canada
Age: 44
Posts: 368
 
My vet is a rabbit expert. He was a speaker for conferences re that matter. He told me there wasnt 100% sure he'd wake up but said it was a bit more than 98% of chances that everything will go fine. But knowing how lucky I am I dont want my bunny to be in the 1.5% of bunnies who dont wake up. He also said that females should be spayed for health reasons but for male it's not necessairy unless they start spraying or being agressive. He even said some un-fixed male rabbit are clean and calm. I've had people telling me that too. I'll see how it goes with my bun...
Sandra is offline  
post #11 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 07:12 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
There's always a small risk in any surgery. I've heard that spaying females is much more complicated than neutering the males. But you have to do what you feel is right for you and your bunny. In my opinion they are much happier without the raging hormones though.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
post #12 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-26-2004, 08:54 PM Thread Starter
Part of the Pack
 
Sandra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Ottawa, Ont. Canada
Age: 44
Posts: 368
 
Now that it's free time for my bunny. I am observing him. He goes back to his
playpen to pee or poo. Which is a good thing because he isnt doing it all over the house. Just when he is in his playpen, sometimes he uses the litter box and some other time he wont. I just dont understand why sometimes he will choose the litter box and some other times no!?
Sandra is offline  
post #13 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2004, 01:03 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
Hmmm...when he pees outside the litter box, is it close to his litter box or far away from it? Sometimes their behinds hang out of the box and they miss and it goes on the floor. If he's doing it nowhere near the litter box he may be doing it to mark his territory. Like I said before, litter box habits greatly improve after they are spayed/neutered because it reduces the urge to mark their territory, and calms them down too. Neither of my fixed rabbits ever pee outside their litter boxes, unless their behinds hang out and they miss. There are a few poops here and there in their pens but thats normal for any bunny.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
post #14 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2004, 01:08 PM
Paw-Talk Therapist
 
veggiegirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: CA
Age: 38
Posts: 3,936
   
Here's some more info for you: Putting hay in the litter box also helps because they like to munch on it while they go.

"Litter Box Training
The most important thing you can do to improve your rabbit's litter box habits is to have him neutered or her spayed. Most altered rabbits will train themselves within a few days if you simply put a box in their cage and then place it or another box in a favorite corner every time you let your rabbit out to play. They are creatures of habit and will always return to the same place to "go". We recommend filling the litter box with newspaper, a layer of nontoxic litter (optional) and a large top layer of fresh hay. The hay will attract bunny to the litter box. This is not unsanitary, but rather a natural way for your rabbit to meet all his digestive needs efficiently! Just make sure there's always fresh hay on top: they usually use only one corner as their bathroom. Regular clay cat litters are not good for rabbits as they are too dusty. Never use a clumping litter as they can be fatal. Even though most pet stores sell them, cedar and pine shavings should be avoided as they cause liver and kidney damage. Safe litters for your rabbit include the recycled newspaper ones such as Yesterdays News or Carefresh. Another good choice is wood stove pellets that you can get at a hardware store such as Home Depot. Newspaper is the cheapest option but requires daily changing.

Spaying/Neutering
It is very important to spay or neuter your rabbit. Most importantly, it prevents unwanted litters and helps with the overpopulation problem. It also provides health benefits including prevention of reproductive system cancers which can strike both male and female rabbits. Also, both male and female rabbits can spray and exhibit sexually aggressive behavior unless they are altered. These behaviors include excessive digging, marking territory with urine or droppings, nipping, fighting with other rabbits, and "humping" everything within sight. Once your rabbit has been "fixed", the hormones and instincts which cause these behaviors are reduced and your rabbit will be happier, more relaxed, and more enjoyable to have around the house!"


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Rats have rights...& mice too!
veggiegirl is offline  
post #15 of 22 (permalink) Old 09-27-2004, 01:09 PM
Newborn Pup
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: England, UK
Age: 35
Posts: 10
 
In the UK we have a massive Rescue problem with Rabbit's. There's over 30,000 in Rescue at any one time.

Rescues across the country have 100's of female and male Rabbit's neutered every year to try and prevent unwanted litters and the risk of Uterine Cancer in female Rabbits, which is about 80% if your female Rabbit is left un-spayed.

With an experienced Vet a neuter Operation should be fine. There's ALWAYS going to be a risk with any animal put under Anaesthetic, same with humans..

In my eye's the benefits of the Operation definitely out way the risks.

Neutering of Rabbit's will also calm there hormone's down and make them easier to litter train/house train.

Louise


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
ellepotter is offline  
Reply

Tags
box trained, litter box, litter box trained, litter box training, litter boxes, litter train, pet store, pet stores, pine shavings, wood stove pellets


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome