Thinking of getting a rabbit.... - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 03:57 AM Thread Starter
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Thinking of getting a rabbit....

Im sure you all get 6 of these a week, but thats what forums are for right?

Well ive been kinda browsing the web for a new idea for a dog, then i came across rabbits as pets, first i thought "thats odd" now i think "I HAVE TO HAVE ONE!!"

Although i have done a LITTLE bit of research on them, i figured id drop by here and ask what everybody thinks, how easy to care for, messy, expensive, what supplies, that old chestnut

Ive had many exotic/different pets before, from dogs to cats, leopard geckos, snakes (dont worry dont have it anymore), gerbils, hampsters, birds, fish....anything you can think of ive pretty much had it so im pretty well with learning to care for animals, just wanted to see what everybody has to say

If theres any questions you need to need feel free to ask, ill be back on tomorrow, for now its bed

Thanks!
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 05:51 AM
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personally, I think that rabbits are very complex to care for. They need hay, pellets, and vegetables, and must be spayed or neutered so they can be litter trained and to prevent health problems. I consider them one of the most expensive in terms of vet care, since if they get sick, they may need a lot of care quickly.

The biggest thing is to not think of them like a guinea pig or a rat which needs to be in a cage, but more like a cat or a dog, which need free roaming of the house for exercise, and then to be contained if there are things they can get into.

Rabbit.org is one of the best sources for information around!

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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 11:41 AM
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personally, I think that rabbits are very complex to care for. They need hay, pellets, and vegetables, and must be spayed or neutered so they can be litter trained and to prevent health problems. I consider them one of the most expensive in terms of vet care, since if they get sick, they may need a lot of care quickly.

The biggest thing is to not think of them like a guinea pig or a rat which needs to be in a cage, but more like a cat or a dog, which need free roaming of the house for exercise, and then to be contained if there are things they can get into.

Rabbit.org is one of the best sources for information around!
I definitely agree. Rabbits are NOT a low maintenance pet. Between all the different foods, letting them out of the cage for play time a few hours per day, cleaning the litter boxes a couple of times per week, and all the damage they can do, they're probably higher maintenance than any pet besides dogs. At least rabbits don't need to be walked several times per day, regardless of weather conditions, which IMHO makes dogs the highest maintenance pet type.

Remember, rabbits will chew on walls, carpet, furniture, wires, and anything else they can get their little jaws around, and they really can't be trained not to do that. The best you can do is block off areas where they can get into trouble, and occupy their attention with other things to chew on, so they'll be too busy to chew on the things they shouldn't.

For instance, Flash isn't allowed in my bedroom, because I have too much wooden furniture and wiring (computer, stereo, etc) that I wouldn't be able to keep him away from. So I just keep the door closed. And in the living room, I've got cardboard boxes (weighed down with heavy stuff in them to keep him from moving them) along the walls, to keep him from pulling up the edges of the carpet or chewing on the corners of the walls. Even with precautions, I'd say Flash has already eaten my security deposit.

The point is that you need to be ready for the commitment of dealing with all these problems if you take in a rabbit. WAY too many bunnies are purchased at pet stores, especially around Easter because people want a cute "Easter bunny", then dumped when people realize that they're not like guinea pigs that you can keep in a cage and ignore most of the time. I'm pretty sure that's how I got Flash - I found him literally wandering the streets by himself about a week after Easter this year.

Also, if you do end up getting a rabbit, get it from a shelter, not a pet store. Don't encourage the breeders. If none of the dog and cat shelters around you have rabbits, google the House Rabbit Society web site and see if they have any branches near you. I can pretty much guarantee that unless you're truly in the middle of nowhere, there's a stray bunny in need of a good home within an hour drive of you.

--Fromper
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 02:41 PM Thread Starter
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Meh.....Everything sounds do'able except for the chewing, cause my room is one of the main places it would stay and i have tons of wires because i wire sound systems and stuff

Ill look into tha tlink you gave me and see what i can do...Thanks for the help!
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 03:24 PM
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For me, rabbits are great pets but they are VERY high maintenance! Everyday I change Ruby's (my rabbit) hay, food, water, and littler. I also have to clean (scrubbing sometimes included) her cage because she tosses her litter out of her litter pan. They also need daily exercise to stay healthy. If you buy a baby rabbit it is also recommended that you get it fixed which costs a few hundred dollars sometimes. Ruby hasn't been fixed yet but she will be soon.

I would say they are very expensive and messy but I think they make good pets. My Ruby doesn't particularly like to be handled. When I pick her up she sometimes kicks and scratches but she loves to be petted. The upside is that when I'm watching TV, I think she "watches" it, too. She will just sit so still and quiet while the TV is on.

Oh! Another thing about rabbits. They need their nails trimmed a lot. Unless you like giant scratches. I remember when I first got Ruby I was afraid to trim her nails so I didn't for almost a month and her nails got terrible. Whenever I picked her up she would scratch me SO hard. I think I have a scar somewhere but still. If you trim their nails once or twice a month you really should have no problem.

Rabbits really are great pets. When you first get a rabbit it's hard but after a while you start to have a good routine and soon you'll get to know and love your rabbit. Hope I helped =D

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 03:54 PM
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I think once you get into a routine then having a rabbit doesn't seem like as much work. Every morning I let my rabbit out of his cage and feed him his fresh veggies for the day. Then when he's out running around I clean out his cage, dump his litter box, and put out fresh food, water, and hay for him. That's pretty much all I HAVE to do every day. Of course I play with him and brush him regularly too.

I'd say I buy food about every 2 weeks at a cost of around $30 ( I have a 22 lb flemish giant, so a smaller rabbit would probably go through food more slowly). The initial cost is of course higher. Then treats and stuff probably run me around $20 or month.

Oh I should mention that the rooms he's allowed in are completely bunny proof and he has free reign and is only locked in his cage at night. I bought conduit (hard plastic tubing) to cover all exposed wires in those rooms and I keep his toys laying around so he doesn't bother with anything else.

That's pretty much my rabbit routine - fortunately I haven't had to bring him to the vet for anything other than routine check ups. I hope that answers some questions
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2008, 04:01 PM
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yeah- learned the hard way with Acacia b/c she's definetly not the right bunnt for a beginner but i got in all my practise with a meanie and i turned her into a softy!! i agree that bunnies are definetly high maintenance but well worth the effort.ever just wanna go up and rub up against someones old dirty fur coat??? no, me either but with a bunny you have the real fur there all times of the day and a good pet is all where its at!! my spay for Acacia cost $237.00!!so after being blown away with the cost i ended up with a well rounded bunny that (still has sick mood swings which are scary) but is gentler and easier to train-my mini-rex Akina isnt spayed but shes also just about 3 years old so im afraid to get her spayed but shes harder to keep litter trained when i clean the box ,so its a good idea to have it fixed young...good luck and keep us posted on how ya go!
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-13-2008, 09:23 AM
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yeah- learned the hard way with Acacia b/c she's definetly not the right bunnt for a beginner but i got in all my practise with a meanie and i turned her into a softy!! i agree that bunnies are definetly high maintenance but well worth the effort.ever just wanna go up and rub up against someones old dirty fur coat??? no, me either but with a bunny you have the real fur there all times of the day and a good pet is all where its at!! my spay for Acacia cost $237.00!!so after being blown away with the cost i ended up with a well rounded bunny that (still has sick mood swings which are scary) but is gentler and easier to train-my mini-rex Akina isnt spayed but shes also just about 3 years old so im afraid to get her spayed but shes harder to keep litter trained when i clean the box ,so its a good idea to have it fixed young...good luck and keep us posted on how ya go!
You definitely need to get Akina spayed! Female rabbits have a VERY high rate of cancer at 2-4 years old if they aren't spayed. It's not too late, and it could allow her to live to 10 years old or more, rather than most likely dying of cancer before she hits 5 years old.

--Fromper
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-13-2008, 09:26 AM
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If it makes you feel any better, we've spayed rabbits as old as 8 in our rescue. So far we haven't had any complications.

We are as gods to the beasts of the fields. We order the time o' their birth and the time o' their death. Between times, we ha' a duty. - Terry Pratchett.

"Men have forgotten this truth", said the fox, "But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-14-2008, 04:06 PM
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really?? the bunny vet told me when i brought Acacia in that she only did a few spays and because of the high death rate with bunnies on anesthesia that she would be nervous doin an older bunny...?? Dr.Simms is a very experienced vet and that was almost 2 years ago,maybe ill call...guys, you got me worrying about her!
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-14-2008, 04:49 PM
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I have a very experienced vet - but his experience is in cats and dogs. So now I also have a bunny vet. I sound crazy that we have 2 vets but I love my dog and cat vet and have been with him for years and years - but he refused to see the buns. There is no way I could have gotten him to spay or neuter them.
But my bunny vet is incredible. We didn't spay Tabby because the vet was sure that she was really old - like 7. I worried that she might already have cancer and spaying her would spread it. But they did her teeth and had to "put her under". She was fine with it. There are blood tests they can do to see what they should use.
Try and find a experienced bunny vet.

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Bean - kitty
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-14-2008, 04:59 PM
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really?? the bunny vet told me when i brought Acacia in that she only did a few spays and because of the high death rate with bunnies on anesthesia that she would be nervous doin an older bunny...?? Dr.Simms is a very experienced vet and that was almost 2 years ago,maybe ill call...guys, you got me worrying about her!
Sounds like a vet who doesn't specialize in bunnies. Try heading to the House Rabbit Society web site and searching for recommended vets in your area.

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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-14-2008, 05:40 PM
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i will but that is our good vet! she has excellent knowledge in all animals especially dogs cats (and i thougt) bunnies,she was really good with Acacia but i will check it out now,thanks.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-14-2008, 05:45 PM
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i just checked out the site and theres no HRS vets on my island province! i will do the whole call aroud thing b/c my turtles vet is in the neighboring city and although its a trick to get out there since i dont have a car,i guess ill call first
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-14-2008, 09:13 PM
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The house rabbit society has a great page that lists a bunch of questions you should ask when looking for a new bunny vet. You've probably seen it before, but let me know if you want the link


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