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post #31 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-02-2011, 10:39 PM Thread Starter
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Ooh thank you! I am only adding it to the display tank (which is empty right now) so if I notice it start to get out of control, I'll reign it in before I add the dwarfs I have 6 months of close watch prescribed for this tank anyway lol
It's not even so much the invasiveness as the sudden crashes. It can be fine for years and then decide to "go sexual".

I would make sure you have a great protein skimmer plus activated carbon in the filter just in case (before you add the seahorses, anyway!) . I would hate to see it crash in your tank and I've seen that many times . A great alternative species is Chaetomorpha, by the way, so check that out if it doesn't work out.




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post #32 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-08-2011, 04:08 PM
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I hate seeing goldfish in tiny bowls :/

THE CHICKEN CAME FIRST!
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post #33 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-08-2011, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Sasami View Post
It's not even so much the invasiveness as the sudden crashes. It can be fine for years and then decide to "go sexual".

I would make sure you have a great protein skimmer plus activated carbon in the filter just in case (before you add the seahorses, anyway!) . I would hate to see it crash in your tank and I've seen that many times . A great alternative species is Chaetomorpha, by the way, so check that out if it doesn't work out.
I do have the activated carbon definitely. I am thinking of getting two carbon filters for both tanks, too. Protein skimmers might cause gas bubble disease which I'd like to avoid - but I am definitely going to check out the alternative species and check my water very frequently to avoid a crash If it gets all out of wack, I'll remove them and use that other species instead. Thanks so much for the tip!


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post #34 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-08-2011, 06:53 PM Thread Starter
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I do have the activated carbon definitely. I am thinking of getting two carbon filters for both tanks, too. Protein skimmers might cause gas bubble disease which I'd like to avoid - but I am definitely going to check out the alternative species and check my water very frequently to avoid a crash If it gets all out of wack, I'll remove them and use that other species instead. Thanks so much for the tip!
I'm not sure how a properly set up protein skimmer would cause issues. Microbubbles mean it needs to be adjusted and mine doesn't give any off unless I mess with it. Unless you're talking about something else?

Removing Caulerpa is easier said than done once it's grown so maybe try confining it to one area as best you can . Look into simple refugium designs, too.




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post #35 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-09-2011, 01:44 PM
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I'm not sure how a properly set up protein skimmer would cause issues. Microbubbles mean it needs to be adjusted and mine doesn't give any off unless I mess with it.
I agree....I cannot imagine attempting something like this without a protein skimmer.

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post #36 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-14-2011, 09:47 AM
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There is a huge debate about it amongst seahorse people about whether or not protein skimmers cause gas bubble disease. A lot of them are really experienced with salt water tanks, and I would think that they would be adjusting it correctly as a whole or that someone would have brought that up, but I don't know.


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post #37 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-14-2011, 03:38 PM
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There is a huge debate about it amongst seahorse people about whether or not protein skimmers cause gas bubble disease. A lot of them are really experienced with salt water tanks, and I would think that they would be adjusting it correctly as a whole or that someone would have brought that up, but I don't know.
Never had an issue in years of keeping seahorses, but then the systems I ran had a lot more volume and space between the skimmer outflow and the tank than 99% of people have.

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post #38 of 40 (permalink) Old 08-23-2011, 08:07 PM
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I have always had a hard time keeping otos alive due to their fragility when being shipped from the wild. I wouldn't recommend them for beginners either.

I still can't keep any alive for more than a week, I wish I could
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post #39 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-14-2011, 05:37 PM
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I definitely agree about the goldfish. They are soo messy and can get pretty big so it's really sad when I see people walking around at the fair with goldfish they've won because you know they aren't going to be alive too much longer
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post #40 of 40 (permalink) Old 06-09-2012, 05:42 AM
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Plecostomus (family Loricariidae)


Other names these fish goes by: Pleco, Suckermouth Catfish, Algae Eater

This one might come as a surprise to some people. After all, pet store employees are very quick to recommend plecos to beginners. These fish, however, should be avoided unless you’ve done extensive research. Many of them grow to be really big (including the common pleco or Hypostomus plecostomus) and shouldn’t be kept in your average, small community aquarium. Plecos are also messy and many have specialized needs such as requiring a low pH or needing to chew on driftwood. The term “algae eater” is usually used to describe a pleco but the truth is they rarely eat algae unless starving. These fish should be supplemented with a variety of foods, including fresh vegetables. All plecos aren’t bad for beginners, though! There are a few smaller species that can make excellent community fish and the bristlenose pleco (Ancistrus triradiatus) is a good example of that. When it comes to plecos it’s extremely important to research the species in question BEFORE making a purchase.
I want elaborate more on the Plecostomus or "sucker fish. They might look cute when young and recommend by your local pet shop. People tend to release them when they get to big not knowing that it is consider hazardous when release these fish into natural waterways, natural ponds, rivers and lake. Many countries are facing this serious issue as these sucker fish have the biggest appetite on feeding on as many native fish eggs as they can find. Greatly reducing the numbers of other fish species.


---Taken From Yahoo---
An armored catfish (Image credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Sun-Sentinel)

A species of "armored catfish" are damaging South Florida's lakes, causing coastal erosion and even burrowing holes that trip up humans walking along the water's edge.

Catfish are usually one of the more popular breeds of aquatic life, with their smooth skin and flavorful meat. There's even a highly unconventional form of fishing known as "noodling," in which people use their bare hands to capture catfish.

But the Sun-Sentinel reports that the Loricariidae (armored catfish) are far less welcome. The non-native and invasive species have rugged scales along their backs and spiky fins. Catching the South American natives can be difficult, as the armored catfish reportedly are not baited by fishing hooks and must instead be caught by nets or even spears.

"There are some people who get totally upset, and I can understand why," Ralph LaPrairie, a fisheries biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, told the Sun-Sentinel.

The Loricariids are a popular aquarium fish, as they use their suckered mouths to clean algae from tanks. But that same behavior that is helpful in fish tanks actually erodes local shorelines up to 10 feet as the fish devastate aquatic plant life. They have also been wreaking havoc in Texas waterways for a number of years.

"One, it's a safety issue. Two, it's a curb-appeal issue," Chip Sollins, owner of Lake Erosion Restoration, a contractor in Boca Raton, Fla., told the paper.

Invasive fish are a growing problem across the U.S. with wildlife officials in Maryland offering a $200 gift certificate raffle to residents who capture and kill snakehead fish, which have been devastating local wildlife in tributaries along the Potomac River.

However, any potential solution for the pests would be an expensive one for local residents. The Sun-Sentinel says hiring a contractor to eradicate any local armored catfish populations can cost as much as $100,000. And there are reportedly millions of the small armored fish currently living in South Florida, with no known natural predators.

"If we do nothing, I think eventually we're going to end up with a sinkhole," said Susanne Ury, president of the Royal Lakes Homeowners Association.

In addition to contributing to erosion, the armored catfish lay their eggs in 18-inch-deep holes along the water's edge, creating potentially dangerous foot traps for people walking in the water.
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