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Old 01-06-2004, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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Deja!! Help!!

Oh boy. Where to start?

Well, my mother is dead set on getting a yorkie and has already found a breeder. She's never, ever had an indoor dog. She has no clue on crate training, basic potty training, or anything relating to getting a puppy, let alone a small companion breed.

I need some info/articles to give her. PLEASE HELP! I really, really am afraid she's getting in over her head and is getting a puppy because she's lonely. I don't think she realizes the commitment needed and I need to show her that rather quickly. She's going to go check out the breeder tomorrow, the pup she's looking at will be ready on the 21st. I don't want her to make an uninformed decision, but I think with the right info this could be very good for her. She's had it rough the last year and a half.

Did I say help?

Stephanie

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Old 01-06-2004, 08:55 PM
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Jade! Wow.... you know - with the right information and a little education a small indoor companion buddy just might be a very good thing for your mom - but you are so right about her needing the reality check and all the good basic common sense information - and the things that we sometimes don't even think about before we make such a life altering decision.

I actually have a few articles started .... can you say *procrastination*?

I will gather up and organize a bunch of info on Introducing the Crate, Crate training, basic obedience, ex-pen/safe-space confinement, etc.... it's a good kick in the butt reason for me to get the things I have been working on finished!

Remy is squeeking in her ex-pen as I write this I'll take a picture of how I did her set-up too, that would help and actually give a visual to what I sometimes have a hard time explaining.


Also.... Everyone here with small companion breeds! Post and give us the best information, advice, etc. based on your experiences owning one.

Is she armed with the right questions to ask the breeder?

Everyone can help with this too!

1) You should be able to see and interact with the mother of the litter and any other dogs that the breeder has. If the father isn't in the breeder's home, ask to see a picture of him.
2) The pups should be fully weaned, wormed and vet certified healthy - depending on the age of the pups they should have had their first shots prior to being sold.
3) Ask about any health guarantee - get it in writing - Also, there should be a contract - read the entire document.
4) The mother, puppies and living quarters should be clean and the puppies should be used to people and well on their way to being socialized.
5) Get a good feel for how the breeder treats the dogs, are they cherished pets or just puppy makers?
6) Breeder should have good knowledge of the bloodlines, records on all matings and prior litters and be able to give references.
7) The breeder should ask the buyer a lot of questions.
8) Trust your gut - your instinct should tell you a lot about the character of the breeder as well as the dogs and pups.


I know I left things out - help me guys! We all have lots of collective experience here

I'll get what I think the most important information your mom should have and post it ASAP!

It *is* a huge step, lots of hard work and time consuming for at least the first six months, but if this is something she really, really wants, I am pretty sure we can pump her full of information

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Old 01-06-2004, 09:10 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks SO much. I emailed her your article in the featured articles section too.

And ANYONE else with experience, please feel free to jump in!

Stephanie

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Old 01-06-2004, 09:32 PM
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Yorkies are very cute dogs.but their bark can be ear piercing all the ones that I have had in my kennels at work were very big on yapping.I think it has to do with the owners boarding them not used to the surroundings.
Anyway a little that I have seen in the Weimeraner(I know it is probably spelled wrong)
A breeder of these had litter of pups sold them as healthy and sound pups but never bothred telling the new owners that the parents carry a genetic mange.I think it is demadectine mange.The vet told the guy it was hereditary.One of the ladies complained and took him to court for her vet bills which can get high.
I would probably try to find out any kind of disease that a parent can carry and pass onto pups.

French Bulldog pups can have hernias because of a genetic defect in the parents.I have also seen a few of this breed with a heart defect and no one knew till it had to be revived while doing a hernia repair.
I have seen the vet treat a couple of yorkies for bad skin allergies.
You just need to make sure that the parents of the pup has no genetic defect that will show up when the pup is older.
Health certificates are good idea but not a sure thing to a very sturdy healthy pup.
I have seen the vet do health certificates but not do test for any genetic problems.If he knows the breeder he is giving cetificates to.
Just my opinion


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Old 01-06-2004, 09:48 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Runt! I've told her to get a written guarantee for any genetic health defects. I think she's pretty dead-set on a yorkie.

Stephanie

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Old 01-06-2004, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Runt

Health certificates are good idea but not a sure thing to a very sturdy healthy pup.
I have seen the vet do health certificates but not do test for any genetic problems.If he knows the breeder he is giving cetificates to.
Just my opinion

I would have to agree with you on that Runt. They aren't a sure thing, nor can they predict the future health of the pup or any genetic problems. They do serve to document the present health of the pup and immunizations and are nescessary if the pup is going to be flown or shipped anywhere.

They are also useful to present to your own personal vet - an appointment should always be secured so you can bring your pup for an examination within 2 days of bringing him or her home.

Not to get off topic here but years ago I had Collies. My first Collie had Demodectic mange (or sometimes called Red Mange). She had a congentital immune deficiency and I spent so much money trying like heck to give my dog a decent life - but it was futile. I chose to end her suffering when she was just over a year old. I threatened to sue the breeder and after realizing I had very little protection legally - I agreed to take pick of her next litter as compensation. I was so lucky that the next pup turned out to be not only beautiful, but totally healthy in every way.

Anyway- even breeds that are prone to hip dysplasia and who's parents have been checked and certified can still produce a pup who will develop the problem ... sometimes there are just no certain 100% ways to predict potential problems that may develop over the duration of the dog's life.

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Old 01-08-2004, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Well she's convinced and already picked out a name for him. She gets him in 2 weeks and his name is Toby.

Stephanie

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Old 01-08-2004, 10:08 AM
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a valuable lesson i've learned....about any breed.....

If you don't want it in that area, never allow it there!! THe furniture is the #1 place people don't want their pets, but they allow them there as puppies then wonder why they can't break them as adults.

Legend being my first small breed I am still learning... I will say that we made a huge mistake in pampering him the way we did. He got taken everywhere with us, and held all the time. NOW... he has come to expect that treatment. *as i type he is sleeping curled up in my lap*

Crate training is essential IMO also. I would also recommend finding a good groomer in advance. *there are so many bad ones these days* I like to ask the breeder for references also... from other buyers and from their vet. To me, someone who isn't willing to hand over that kind of information is not someone i want to deal with.

Just my 2 cents....


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Old 01-09-2004, 06:33 PM
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Quote:
1) You should be able to see and interact with the mother of the litter and any other dogs that the breeder has. If the father isn't in the breeder's home, ask to see a picture of him.
2) The pups should be fully weaned, wormed and vet certified healthy - depending on the age of the pups they should have had their first shots prior to being sold.
3) Ask about any health guarantee - get it in writing - Also, there should be a contract - read the entire document.
4) The mother, puppies and living quarters should be clean and the puppies should be used to people and well on their way to being socialized.
5) Get a good feel for how the breeder treats the dogs, are they cherished pets or just puppy makers?
6) Breeder should have good knowledge of the bloodlines, records on all matings and prior litters and be able to give references.
7) The breeder should ask the buyer a lot of questions.
8) Trust your gut - your instinct should tell you a lot about the character of the breeder as well as the dogs and pups.
I breed goldens, so I'd have to agree with everything that Deja's already said. I think the #1 most important thing, IMO, is to see where the animals are kept and see the parents. It sounds like she's already checked that out, so tell her good luck!!!!
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