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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 04:46 AM Thread Starter
 
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Parvo

I have a friend who has recently lost one of her dogs due to old age and an enlarged heart. The dog passed peacefully at home shortly before a scheduled vet visit.
Tonight I got an e-mail from her and apparently her mother said her other dog has Parvo. I'm assuming the dog was taken to the vet and diagnosed.
Please everyone, be sure your pets are up to date on all their shots! Parvo is such an easy disease to avoid with regular vaccinations.
What can I tell her to do other than what the vet recommends for treatment? I've heard Parvo can be picked up in the grass outside or in the house where a dog with Parvo has been...what all should she do to irradicate it while the dog is being treated?
Thanks
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 04:54 AM Thread Starter
 
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This is what I've found...how close to being correct is it?
PARVOVIRUS INFECTION

How does a dog become infected with parvovirus?

The causative agent of CPV disease, as the name infers, is a virus. The main source of the virus is the feces of infected dogs. The stool of an infected dog can have a high concentration of viral particles. Susceptible animals become infected by ingesting the virus. Subsequently, the virus is carried to the intestine where it invades the intestinal wall and causes inflammation.

Click here for the rest of the article
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 06:20 AM
 
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Mandie I am sorry to hear your friend has lost one dog due to old age and that the other is now has Parvo....If the dog does have Parvo the vet should have quarantined him/her, and began I.V. treatments and other med's used. I have dealt with 2 puppies in the past that had parvo, and sadly one wasn't diagonosed fast enough and passed away in my arms, as for the other we were lucky enough to know the signs by then and was able to seek treatment for the dog.
We had a big scare here in Feb/March when Beau & Ajax were showing severe signs of Parvo and here they don't quarantine like they do in the states, so we had them on I.V. fluids, meds, and injections at home although it turned out not to be parvo the initial med's did help whatever virus they had. Sadly Parvo can be brought in on your shoes as well, if one walk's through an area that has the live parvo virus, such as grass for example they can track it into their home. Yes proper vaccinations do help however keep in mind that even when vaccinated a puppy under the age of 6 months is still said to be at a high risk, and then of course the risk get's lower from 6-12 months, however it is known that a dog can get the parvo virus up to the age of 2 and it is not common (but not unheard of) for a dog over 2 to get the virus.
This is just from my personal research and dealings with Parvo and working in a vet clinic many many years ago. The research you have provided above is excellent and I think everyone should read it. If your friend's dog does have Parvo I pray they are treating it with the proper med's and that they have dissenfected their house from top to bottom with a 10-90 bleach/water solution, you (they) can even use that solution in a spray bottle for furniture, carpets, drapes, ect. As it isn't strong enough to bleach any fabrics (but still take precautions). You (they) can also take that solution and place it in either a very large spray bottle or buy one of those yard sprayers for the lawn and spray the grass and outside surrounding areas with it as well. Parvo is a nasty disease to clean up after, but if all precautions are taken all should be okay. It is also uncommon for a dog to get Parvo twice from my understanding, (but I could be wrong).
I hope all works out for everyone
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 06:23 AM Thread Starter
 
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thanks Kim...I'll advise her with what you said...she's only 15 so I'll be sure to inform her mother as well.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 06:32 AM
 
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Your Welcome Mandie, please keep us updated
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 06:35 AM
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ok...i've also had a big scare recentely. maybe someone can help me.

my neighbors across the street had two lab mix puppies (about 4-5 months old). well, my friend jim told me that one just passed away from parvo. they got the other one tested and all that.

the problem is that my two met them about 2 -3 weeks ago (they were all on leashes and sniffed and basically met). they were in close contact. we wanted them to meet because they always bark at each other when we are walking them. so we figured it would help. they had rabies tags so i thought she'd vax'inated for parvo. guess not.

mine of vaccinated of course. they haven't shown any signs of being sick at all. they are normal. i just want to know what to do. if the other dog isn't sick, can it come in contact with mine? what about the grass over there, etc? i've heard that the parvo virus doesn't leave the "house" for a whole year.

thanks guys!


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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 06:43 AM
 
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Jane your right parvo can stay in the house for up to one year, that is why those that have dogs that have passed away due to parvo are advised to not get another puppy for at least a year. I would just keep a look out for signs (lack of eating, drinking, playing, ect), Parvo is commonly passed through dogs sniffing or eating other dog's feces, but can be transmitted in other ways. The article that Mandie posted above is of great help
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 07:02 AM
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thanks kim! yes, i read that article. just wanted to be sure!

well, chaquita (aka: fatty) isn't having eating problems.
and they are playing (killing) each other right now! haha!

but i'll keep an eye out. thanks again.


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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 11:38 AM
 
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That article is great Mandie. I can tell you first hand that proper treatment can help save a dogs life. Six days after I brought my precious Gazoo home he was diagnosed with Parvo. (he had also recieved his first puppy vaccination thankfully). 30lbs at 8weeks was something that worked in his favor though and he made it. I've seen many dogs who did not make it though.

We'll be thinking of and praying for your friends other dog.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 05:40 PM Thread Starter
 
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I got another e-mail today...the dog has been at the vet since yesterday and can't come home until Monday at the very earliest. Apparently the vet says she is responding well to treatment so far, so that's a good sign.
This weekend they will be spending bleaching the house and yard top to bottom. Apparently the dog did have all her shots including her Parvo shot, so it's a mystery to them how she got it.
We had a scare about a year ago with Orion. He was vaccinated and everything, but started showing symptoms including a lot of vomiting and diarreah containing blood. The vet was running the tests but sent us home with IV bags to administer fluids under the skin and antibiotics as well as a few other things...the next day the results came back negative, and so he started some other tests while we continued to keep him hydrated with fluids under the skin and treating him with antibiotics. A couple of days later, he was totally normal! When I was outside cleaning up the poop in the yard, I found the culprit of Orion's illness...he had gotten into the plastic Easter Grass from the kids Easter baskets and eaten it! I found it all in his poops! Apparently the grass had cut him up like paper cuts on the inside and that has caused the blood in his stools! We finished out the course of antibiotics as a precaution and all was fine. Scared the daylights outta me though! Now we make sure Easter Baskets contain timothy hay rather than plastic grass.
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post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-23-2004, 07:53 PM Thread Starter
 
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Oh, the above article was found here: http://www.animalclinic.com/parvo.htm sorry I didn't link it before, I accidently closed out of it!
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