Newbie - getting ready to move frogs into a new tank - what do I need to know? - Paw Talk - Pet Forums
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-03-2010, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
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Newbie - getting ready to move frogs into a new tank - what do I need to know?

Hello! I have just posted this elsewhere as well, but any and all information is important so just trying to get as much as possible
as I would like to know if there's anything I should know beforehand. Sorry - it's a little long!

I received 2 African Dwarf Frogs for Christmas from Brookstone. The very basic and simple care instructions it came with seemed very ridiculous to me and since then I've been reading up on proper care and purchasing new goods for them. They've been in the tiny Brookstone housing ever since, and I think I am ready to move them. While in the Brookstone container I have done about a 50% to 60% water change a few times as the water has a faint oder and there's hidden food within the gravel - I do try to suck whatever I can find after feeding.

I've read that bottled water may have harmful additives so I have not used that at all. So far I have used bottled Fish water from the pet store, and I do have tap water conditioner - the water in the new tank has been treated with conditioner. Now I understand a bigger tank would be best for the frogs, but what I have purchased is a two gallon acrylic terrarium with a lid. I have a larger aquarium tank in the attic that my aunt got rid of a few months ago, when I clear out a space I will do more homework and look into moving them into that - if they are still healthy and happy until then. She moved and donated her fish. The tank up until then had been active and used, but I've come across so much about aquariums in my ADF research that it seems overwhelming and complicated so I would need to do extensive research before attempting to do anything with it. Think it's about 10 gallons.

So it's a bit long but below are my thoughts and questions I would love to have addressed. Please feel free to point out any important info or issues, I would like to move my frogs right away.

--------------------------------------------------------------------->

~ The water in my new set has tap water conditioner and has been sitting out for possibly about 10 hours. I have one live aquatic plant (Umbrella Plant), flat craft store river stones, an aquarium house, and an artificial plant. Brookstone has a bamboo shoot which I was think of placing in the new place as well. Should I think about another live plant or two?

~ Both Brookstone housing where the frogs currently are, and the new place are in the same room so I think they're about the same temp.

~ I do have a submerging aquarium heating tube that I've placed within a hard thin plastic tube to protect the frogs from touching it. Should still heat the water without damaging the tube.

~ Otherwise I was thinking of buying a Terrarium heating pad that you place underneath on the outside, but I was thinking maybe the bottom would get too hot for them?

~ I do have an aquarium thermometer. Prior to moving them, should I be sure the temps of the two places are the same, and then once relocated gradually warm the water to between 70 and 80 degrees?

~ So by now I'm guessing there's plenty of bacteria in the Brookstone place and is why I want to get them out of there right away! New place is probably fairly clear and clean. What should I do about this, should I move them anyway? Should I place some of their dirty water inside and wait about a day for the move?

~ I wasn't planning on using a filter, I was going to do 50% or so water changes once a week unless recommended otherwise. I have a small filter that holds a sponge (charcoal free) from a previous aquatic pet a few years back - it was either a Red Ear Slider turtle or my first ADF who jumped out the tank due to the water level being too full - my fault. I think the filter was used last for the frog.

~ About the frogs, they seem to be doing well. Haven't noticed anything sickly looking or odd behavior. They are very responsive to food and seem to become very excited when they suspect it's feeding time. Both eat well. They've been eating frozen brine shrimp and both frozen and freeze dried blood worms. They spit out tadpole and Brookstone pellets. They seemed to like cut up meal worms but made too much of a mess so I've stopped for now. I've been feeding them about every other day.

I think that's all my questions for now. I really want to move the little guys and have them in a warmer environment yet be safe and happy, thanks for reading and addressing any of the above!

~Michelle
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-03-2010, 06:09 PM
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Usually want you want to do is cycle the tank first. Meaning you want the tank to go through all the normal spikes before there is any living animals added. BUT you could place them in now IF you monitor the water quality exremly well. Take the gravel from their current tank and place it in a cup or mesh bag. Bare bottom is usually a good choice for frogs since they tend to lunge for their food.

Is this what you have?
http://www.brookstone.com/Frog-O-Sphere-frogs.html


If so.... HOLY POOP, you are right about the terrible care infomation.





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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-03-2010, 06:25 PM Thread Starter
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BUT you could place them in now IF you monitor the water quality exremly well. Take the gravel from their current tank and place it in a cup or mesh bag.
Hi, thanks a lot for your reply ! I have a quick question about your suggestion to place their old gravel in a cup or mesh bag. Do you mean place it in the new tank & water to get the bacteria party started ?

Yes the Frog-O-Sphere is exactly what I have. My friend bought it and one for herself too, and was very excited about the simpleness of their care based on the Brookstone instructions. As soon as she said, "and the water only needs to be changed twice a year" I knew something wasn't right . For those not familiar with the Brookstone care guide, it's basically change the water twice a year because their Frog-O-Sphere is living and will take care of cleaning itself. Feed each frog (two in one) 2 provided pellets twice a week. Keep the temp room temperature, and for water changes only use bottled water.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-03-2010, 06:28 PM
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Usually it is recomended they you put the filter from the old tank but since there is no filter in your case the gravel from the old tank is better then nothing.

I am sure someone who knows more will come along soon.





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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-03-2010, 08:50 PM
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Are you sure those plants are aquatic? I'm pretty sure umbrella plants are sold as being aquatic but are actually not. I would avoid bamboo, personally, since it's not supposed to be submerged (only the bottom part).

Some easy aquatic plants are java ferns, water wisteria, water sprite, anacharis (although people have mixed results), and dwarf anubius. Most types of vallisneria are also quite hardy and fast growing.

Stick with the aquarium heater, heating pads aren't meant for aquariums.

Having a filter will help your tank cycle and that sponge filter will be fine for a couple of frogs (if you ever decided to get more frogs, though, you'd want something stronger). Yup, gradually warm them by adjusting the heater.

As for cycling, add some gravel from the old tank to the new one. That'll kick start things. A few years ago I wrote an article on how to cycle an aquarium, you can read it here: http://www.paw-talk.net/forums/f77/c...ium-43789.html

The article is more about fish tanks but you'd follow the same steps with aquatic frogs.




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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-04-2010, 01:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Are you sure those plants are aquatic? I'm pretty sure umbrella plants are sold as being aquatic but are actually not. I would avoid bamboo, personally, since it's not supposed to be submerged (only the bottom part).

Some easy aquatic plants are java ferns, water wisteria, water sprite, anacharis (although people have mixed results), and dwarf anubius. Most types of vallisneria are also quite hardy and fast growing.
Hi, thanks for the article. I didn't even consider how the plant would interact with the system. I would prefer a plant that would be more beneficial so I'll note the names for the next trip to the pet store.

Well the plant I have was listed at the pet store as a Live Aquatic Plant for fresh water aquarium, its name is: Spathiphyllum Wallisii , 4" Umbrella Plant. But I think I would prefer something that's known to help breakdown and absorb things so I'll check out your recommendations.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-04-2010, 01:37 AM
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Unfortunately, a lot of pet stores sell non-aquatic plants for aquariums. They're often plants that can survive for a little while submerged but most of them slowly rot away in a fish tank. That's why it's best to look up plants beforehand.

Once I was in PetCo and out of the eight or so aquatic plants they had for sale, only two were actually aquatic!




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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-06-2010, 03:58 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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I'm pretty sure umbrella plants are sold as being aquatic but are actually not. I would avoid bamboo, personally, since it's not supposed to be submerged (only the bottom part).

Some easy aquatic plants are java ferns, water wisteria, water sprite, anacharis (although people have mixed results), and dwarf anubius. Most types of vallisneria are also quite hardy and fast growing.
Hi, thanks for the plant suggestions. Before heading off to Petco I looked up the names and jotted notes about each. Think I only found two from my list (along with 2 dead dwarf frogs in the store's tank! ) and the only one that looked bushy, healthy and plentiful was the Anacharis (egeria densa). Bought a nice bunch for only $2.99 , compared to my $4.99 Umbrella plant.

I was going to ask you if I shouldn't even bother with the umbrella plant and take it out, but then found my answer from a different topic - basically yes unless I want it to die and rot in the water. But do you think I should try to plant it in a planter so it doesn't go to waste, considering it's been in a tank with frogs? My mom like to grow things.

What are the mixed results that people have had, and what is your opinion on this plant? It will be in medium light, and I still do not have a filter in place - I have one available but still working out a few things. Thanks!
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-06-2010, 02:01 PM
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You could try to plant it, yeah . I'm not much help in that aspect, though!

Some people just can't get anacharis to grow. It wasn't usually a problem for me but I had one tank where it would grow weirdly and drop its leaves. There are some theories out there and one points to the problem being calcium. Supposedly if you add a small amount of calcium (normally sold for reef tanks), it'll help. I'm not sure if it's true. I tried it once as an experiment but didn't notice much of a change--although it did better than the anacharis in the other tank. However, I wouldn't recommend adding anything to a tank with frogs because they absorb everything through their skin.

In general, though, I've found the plant to be hardy and fast-growing. I've kept it in tanks with low wattage fluorescent lights but also in tanks with high-powered compacts. It can even be left floating.




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