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Hey everyone,
I'm new here and need some help. Here's the story...
I have a 5 year old beagle mix, Kona. I crate trained her about a year and a half ago because she was waking me up in the middle of the night to go out and also because there wasn't enough room in the bed with the new boyfriend :) She took to it beautifully, in fact, at night all I need to say was "bedtime" and she would go right in her crate and not make a peep all night.
About a month ago I moved to a new place and we've had problems ever since. She's very inconsistent, some nights she goes in and stays quiet and other nights she barks incessantly and I eventually have to let her out and she jumps in the bed. I live in a 4 family home now and can't have her barking late at night. Sometimes she goes in and is quiet for a few hours before she starts barking, other nights she is barking as soon as I put her in, and yet other nights she is fine. I can't find the common denominator as to what is causing this. She definitely barks more when my boyfriend stays over, like she wants to be with him, not in the crate (but then again, sometimes she's fine...like I said, very inconsistent) and she barks more after we've been out then come home and want to go to bed right away. But sometimes, it's really for no reason. I walk her every day and make sure she has peed and pooped before she goes in the crate.
It's very frustrating! If I lived in a single family home, I would let her bark until she realized she's not getting out but I can't do that here. Any help would be appreciated!
Thanks,
Keri
 

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Yeah really by letting her out, your teaching her that her barking is getting her what she wants - let out of the crate. Ideally you could ignore her when she barks so that she realizes that barking isn't going to get her let out of the crate. But I certainly understand that you don't want her to bother the other tennents in the house.

When she barks at night, is there any way you could let her outside for a bathroom break? Then bring her back inside and put her back in the crate? Every time she barks in her crate take her outside for 5 minutes or so, don't let her wonder the house or get in bed with you. Don't pet her, don't talk to her, just calmly bring her outside, let her go to the bathroom if she has to, then put her back in her crate.

It might be annoying for awhile to keep getting up at night but at least this way you're stopping her barking, but she's learning that all barking in her crate gets her is a bathroom break - she doesn't get any attention from you or your boyfriend and she doesn't get to get into bed with you or anything like that.

Other than that I would just do a bit of extra work to make sure she feels comfortable in her crate. With all the changes of moving, maybe she's feeling a bit unsure of things. Some owners will feed their dog in their crates, or give some kind of a treat inside the crate so they learn to associate it with positive things.

I don't know if you'd want to do this but you can train dogs to stay off the bed, without having them be in a crate. I don't know if maybe she'd be happier and less barky in that situation but you could try setting up a bed for her next to or near your bed and having her sleep there.

Also don't know if this will help in this situation - but my dog will sometimes bark in his crate if it's not covered. I use a sheet and cover his crate (you can buy crate covers too), it makes it darker for him and he doesn't get distracted or woken up as easily by things going on outside of his crate.
 

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Also, have you tried to bring her crate in the room near to your bed?
 

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Dragonrain's got it right, I think—it sounds like anxiety and uncertainty brought on by the move. And by responding to her barking, you may be making the situation worse. Your best bet is to use desensitization training. I've got a blog post about the technique as it relates to separation anxiety, but the technique is adaptable to enforcing bedtime as well. Focused mainly on preventing destructive behavior, but there's some great info and links on desensitization training in general - I know *I* learned a lot writing it!

EDIT: Guess I'm not allowed to add links to posts yet; head to petproblemsolver.com and look for the post entitled "Keeping the Wolf from the Door."
 

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have you tried taking you pup out for longer walks, or to the park? sometimes getting that energy out can help. i know that and have a super soft comfy spot for them seems to help a lot.
 

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sounds like an issue i once had too. I covered her crate to block out any visual stimuli, put a baby's noise maker on ( Makes sounds like static or crashing waves on the beach ) to block out noisee she might be hearing. Most likely your dog is too alert to its surroundings, you need to block it out. start the dog training over again like she is a puppy. keep the crate by your bed and give a correction when she barks, and praise when she is quiet.
 
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