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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a 10 yr old male cat and a 3 year old Shih-Tzu dog who weighs about 9 lbs..

I love Doberman dogs and I'd like to add a Doberman to the family but I'm concerned about safety ...

I know that a lot of dog breeds get along with cats especially if you bring in a puppy ... then again there are some breeds who don’’t.

My cat is a large breed (17 lbs.), he's very friendly and very playful and active even at this age. He's always been more active than an average cat. He gets along with everybody. The same with my dog. Both of them are very friendly, playful and sociable.

Do Dobermans get along with cats and small dogs ?
 

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Aspires to Stupidity
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Honestly, all dogs are different. They all have their own personality and their own likes and dislikes so there's no way to know without introducing them.


I had a 3/4 doberman 1/4 german sheppard cross. She got along with all dogs(all the one's she had met anyway) and loved to play with my mom's pomeranian, but cats....well she played too rough. She never meant to hurt them, but I guess she didn't really know how to play with them.


I say that if you get a doberman or any breed for that matter, to first introduce new animals to her while she is in a kennel. And then again while the other animal is in a kennel and she is out. Then if that seems to work out then put both animals on a leash and gradually bring them closer together. You'll know if it'll work out or not. I don't recommend just releasing both animals together right away, that could end in a big mess. Good luck and I hope it works out for you and that I was helpful. :D
 

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Yes, you can buy a purebred DOBERMANN puppy. I think that there won't be any problem, also it's better to teach the DOBERMANN puppy something before it grows up. DOBERMANN breed is a wonderful dog breed. Good luck.
 

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Rodentologist
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Your best bet if you're concerned with your other animals is to seek out an adult doberman at a rescue that they've temper tested with other animals. :) That way you don't have to worry about ending up with a puppy with a lot of drive, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Honestly, all dogs are different. They all have their own personality and their own likes and dislikes .... :D
That's so true ...

thank you for replying, I appreciate your input.

I don't put a value on dogs because of their breed or pedigree ... They are all precious in my eyes.

But my question is basic, it's more about the breed, -- some breeds have a track record and you know from the start that it's going to be an issue or not ... for example if you get a bulldog, from the start you know that there is a good chance of problems with other dogs.

Overall I'm getting the feeling that Dobermans don't have a basic problem with cats .... which is good news :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your best bet if you're concerned with your other animals is to seek out an adult doberman at a rescue that they've temper tested with other animals. :) That way you don't have to worry about ending up with a puppy with a lot of drive, etc.

I had set my heart on getting a puppoy but your post got me thinking.
 

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I'd say the most common characteristic with dobermans is stubburness and very fast learners. The only problem with those two are that they learn fast, but they don't want to listen to you, so it's almost pointless, lol. Okay, maybe not that bad, lol.
 

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I think it all depends on the training that you do with it, I think it is easier to teach a puppy to like things when they are the age that they don't know the fun of chasing, they haven't had any issues with cats before, and they are too little to be able to kill the cat easily.

I don't think that any breed is a sure bet on if they will have problems, or wont at least behavioral. I think the only thing breed descriptions help on is energy level, and health problems prone to the breed.
 

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Super Soaker Snot Ball Shooter
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My Dobe is turning 10 years old this month and I can say without a doubt that she is the best dog I've ever owned. She is very smart, was easy to train, and gets along great with other dogs, cats, and people. She's very laid back and loyal. I will definitely get another one in the future when this one passes away (but hopefully not for many more years!).
 

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My parents has always owned dobermen, and everyone my family has had were very loyal but some where to over loyal if you get what i mean? Very protective over them. But as anoter poster said you CANNOT say this and that about any breed its how YOU bring them up and train them to be.
Good luck, but even if you go to a rescue you never know you might find the perfect adult dog instead of a puppy! x
 

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I have a book called the Howell Book of Dogs. It gives a very brief overview of just about every breed you can imagine. Of course, every dog has its own personality so there are no hard rules, but according to the book, what the dog was originally bred for usually impacts behavior. (So you might not want to have a hunting dog around cats.)

I looked up Dobermans, and they were bred as a companion and guard dog, not a hunting dog. It says "They can be good with other pets and, when taught not to chase, with the family cat.”
 

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even some hunting dogs wont have issues with the family cat, we have had many labs and they are the best with other critters, a few cats even kicked on of ours out of his doghouse.

And one cat had kittens in his doghouse and he would go check on them. it was cute.

not that that has much to do with Dobermans but it does say that not all dogs act the way the breed was intended.
 

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True. That's why I made the disclaimer "every dog has its own personality so there are no hard rules". :D

I have a lab mix, and she's great with my cat. (Although she does chase him occasionally - but would never hurt him.) I think labs were bird dogs, though, so I don't know if that makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have a book called the Howell Book of Dogs. It gives a very brief overview of just about every breed .....

according to the book, what the dog was originally bred for usually impacts behavior. (So you might not want to have a hunting dog around cats.)

I looked up Dobermans, and they were bred as a companion and guard dog, not a hunting dog. It says "They can be good with other pets and, when taught not to chase, with the family cat.”
Thank you for your realistic answer. This is the type of answer I was looking for. I think a realistic answer is more useful (and safer) than a romantic one.

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I appreciate all the input. But I can’t help but to make a point here.


Nurture is important but you can not ignore the nature of the dog, the purpose for which they were created. I don't mean to be harsh but it would be naive to say that a hunting dog and, say, the little miss doxie behave the same around other pets.


it’s not safe to think that all breeds behave the same around other pets. All dogs and all breeds (including hybrids) are valuable and precious but different breeds behave differently. This romantic view of dogs can create problems, even bodily injury. You can not put a dog in a situation or environment that is not compatible with them and expect everything to go perfect. And to go perfect ALL the time.


Murphy’s law says that it pays to err on the side of caution.


True , nurture (training) is a factor but you can not ignore the nature , at least it is not safe to ignore what they were created for (the breeds general purpose, like hunting etc).


They don't breed dogs just for looks , shape or muscle tone. They breed dogs more than anything else for behavior.


There’s a reason most police and military dogs are German Shepherd.


There’s a reason the nickname of Rottweiler is junkyard dog.


There’s a reason breeders warn buyers that Bulldog is not for everybody.


And there is a reason why the army takes German Shepherds to war front and not Border Collies.



{Before you write a reply that you had a German Shepherd that was the kindest dog in the whole wide world:


1) I had a German Shepherd myself,


and 2) you are missing the point!}


:)
 

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Yes dogs are bred for behavior but not each dog is the same reacting with pets. I don't know a breed of dog that some have not been ok with cats and small dogs, I also don't know of a breed that all have been good with other pets.

All dogs come from wolves. They are different from wolves now and every type of dog can be trained to react in a certain way. You can have a lapso apso (spelling?) trained as an attack dog, but not many will take it seriously and its probably not the greatest for it because of its size, body shape, speed and so on.

No one can tell you if a dobie would be good or bad with cats just that it has worked and it hasn't worked before. It can be done, but it can be done wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It’s Lhasa apso.

I don’t want to argue with you. You’re entitled to your own opinion. Thank you for posting.


 

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Will It Ever Change?
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LOL :crylaugh:

Mike, I totally understand what you're saying. You're just speaking factually, based on no bias, opinion, or emotion. I like that. I think like that. And the amount of times I've been told I come across harsh... where's my jar of dimes...?

The closest I've come to experiencing Dobe life, is a dog I had growing up, Sasha, she was 1/4 Dobe, 1/4 German Sheppard, 1/2 Choc. Lab. Quite simply the most loyal, affectionate, and protective dog I've met. She could also be standing beside you, outside in the driveway, then just *poof* jump 3 feet in the air and catch a finch flying by. She didn't give up on chasing every rabbit and squirrel, until her hips started deteriorating.

One time one of my Dad's employees was tickling me (I was about 8) and I was squealing loud, and then Sasha just decided it was enough, so she kept jumping and wagging her tail BUT her bark really turned. She had no problem being the family care bear, but in her mind there were still lines that could be crossed.

Another time, same store (my folks ran it) Sasha was sleeping beside the front counter (boat/motor/small engine repair etc.) when a customer came in the store. I was there, again about 8 years old (makes Sasha about 2-3), it was early morning. The guy entered, tall, lean, dark hair, dark jeans, black leather jacket. Well, Sasha awoke from a dead sleep, and was standing at his feet growling and hackles up, before the guy was 5 feet in the door. Dad apologized and put sasha in the office. Sold the guy a wicked boating flashlight/spotlight. A week later we saw him on the news, arrested for stealing from some cottage properties... and he used that light! Creepy I say.

Sasha was beyond smart. She was her own person. And she lived with us, our Rotty, and 2 cats... with no problems. I could teach her anything in half an hour. Not just shake a paw, but she knew left vs. right. One day during the summer I was bored, so her and I went outside and I taught her how to jump through a hula hoop. Started resting on the ground, stopped one foot off the ground (she had a Lab body, heights weren't her thing). I remember how much fun she had, tail wagging the whole time. Go for walks with a leash (but not attached to her) and she'd never go 5 feet from you. We got her as a sick puppy, neglected on a farm, drinking pond water and eating kibble out of holes dug in the ground, looking like a mini dachshund.

So now that I've rambled on :D, my point is just to tell you that's what I experienced, for the 12 years we had her. My life of education has me scientifically trained. I'm analytical, I make observations, and make hypotheses based on all ready known facts. I find dog breeds, behaviour, and nature/nurture interesting. Probably why I took Anthropology too lol. I don't know much of Dobies, but I'd enjoy chatting more with you about it. I'm a researching champ :p
 

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I know it is not what you believe, but for what it is worth, here is my 2 cents:


I have a boxer/pittie mix who is 16 months old and a Am. Bulldog/pittie mix who is 5 years old. To the best of my knowledge (both were county shelter rescues) they had no contact with cats. Or they mave have loved them. Or they may have hated them. Who knows right? LoL

By breed, you would think no go. But with a lot of -supervision- at first and some work, they are both fine with our new cat. The cat even drinks out of their water dish with them now.

Yes, dogs are bred for behaviors/jobs, but so many of them today do not perform their job, despite the breeding. A dog's #1 purpose in today's society is companion (overall, by no means is that -every- dog, but you see my point). So, like so many others have said, I do not think the breed really matters....training training training.
 
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