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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, hope everyones doing well.
sooo I have a question for anyone who has or has had a dog, that theyve crate trainned. Spezza has sepration anixety and it was suggested by a vet and the spca that we put him in a cage when we are gone... Im not soo happy about this idea but if it will help him them im willing to try. I was wondering what type of cage is the best for them ? I know that there only suppose to be able to stand up turn around and lay down from what i read in a book correct me if im wrong please, and that the cage shouldnt be to big, But what type of cage should I use ? Plast or metal or does it matter thanks:sneakyhug
 

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Cage makes dogs, especially those who suffer separation anxiety, feel comfortable treating the cage as his own territory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cage makes dogs, especially those who suffer separation anxiety, feel comfortable treating the cage as his own territory.
Thats what iv read, :) and have been told, but what type of cage should it be ? plastic metal ? im not exactly sure.
 

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I don't think it really matters too much. I personally use a metal crate but I've used plastic ones before too. If Spezza chews on things a lot you might want to go with metal just because she could maybe chew on the plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the Info he doesn't chew from what i no but just in case metal might be safer
 

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Ops sorry I called him a "she"!

Yeah I like the metal ones. I don't know why I guess they kind of seem sturdier to me, although I don't know for sure if they are. My dog is a chewer too so I didn't want him chewing on the plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ops sorry I called him a "she"!

Yeah I like the metal ones. I don't know why I guess they kind of seem sturdier to me, although I don't know for sure if they are. My dog is a chewer too so I didn't want him chewing on the plastic.
spezzas anixety is he pees on our toilet bowl :giggle:so we shut the bathroom door so hed stop but now he pees at the door and barks even thou the tv is on. hes having a hard time remember that where going to be coming back, but then again i dont blame him we found out his history, from what we learned appearntly he was at mtl shelter for almost 2 years and then at the aylmer spca, thats where we had adopted him but appearntly before all the shelters, he was a stray they believe him to be abandoned. so I sort of understand His anixety, even at the vet yesturday he was terrified i was going to leave him, he was sitting on his daddy while i was at the front desk,filling out papers and he kept crying like crazy. When me and him went into the room and he was on the table and the vet took him closer to her he kept trying to run to me, when they wanted to do tests and i had to ask hubby about it and opened the door to the room to call hubby in spezza freaked out completely thinking I was leaving him. Im sure he will come around eventually thou.
 

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I disagree.. Here's why.
1. A dog that was never placed in a crate then suddenly put in a crate will not make him feel safe. Plenty of training needs to be implemented. And a lot of patience.
2. It depends on his level of anxiety when left alone. IME once the brain switches to panic a crate will not calm him, it makes him worse. (*I think you might remember June 9 2011 [I remember the day like it was yesterday] when I came home to Coco in his plastic kennel.. He had tried in his panic to chew his way out, got his jaws stuck open on the bars of the door. There was blood and saliva everywhere, carpets still stained, and after the infection cleared up he was never quite the same. Even opening the door to put books in it [ because we used it for storage afterwards] he would wake up and shake.

I have seen dogs take to a kennel right away but others require some amount of training. The plastic ones more closely mimic a den which is why they calm down, when trained.. The wire ones would never be on my list bc I would be too nervous with a paw or teeeth getting caught in it somehow. My nervousness to kennels is only based off one dog, however, stuck jaws is not uncommon if you google it.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents. I would couple the kennel training with positive things like treats (if he like to eat while alone fill him a kong) and some natural calmer like Rescue Remedy.

I honestly wsh you the best of luck. Be patient with him, because he doesn't mean to be anxious! (you realise that)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I disagree.. Here's why.
1. A dog that was never placed in a crate then suddenly put in a crate will not make him feel safe. Plenty of training needs to be implemented. And a lot of patience.
2. It depends on his level of anxiety when left alone. IME once the brain switches to panic a crate will not calm him, it makes him worse. (*I think you might remember June 9 2011 [I remember the day like it was yesterday] when I came home to Coco in his plastic kennel.. He had tried in his panic to chew his way out, got his jaws stuck open on the bars of the door. There was blood and saliva everywhere, carpets still stained, and after the infection cleared up he was never quite the same. Even opening the door to put books in it [ because we used it for storage afterwards] he would wake up and shake.

I have seen dogs take to a kennel right away but others require some amount of training. The plastic ones more closely mimic a den which is why they calm down, when trained.. The wire ones would never be on my list bc I would be too nervous with a paw or teeeth getting caught in it somehow. My nervousness to kennels is only based off one dog, however, stuck jaws is not uncommon if you google it.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents. I would couple the kennel training with positive things like treats (if he like to eat while alone fill him a kong) and some natural calmer like Rescue Remedy.

I honestly wsh you the best of luck. Be patient with him, because he doesn't mean to be anxious! (you realise that)
what i was thinking of doing is before actually locking him in it, was leaving it open for a few days with his bed in it so he can think of it sorta like a dog house his territory so he can go in and out of it as he pleases then slowly working him up to being locked in it longer n longer examplle 5 mins 10 mins 20 mins half an hour so that its not over whelming to much for him ? just a thought
 

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That's actually what most people do, it's a good idea. We tried it and after he realised he could be locked inside(even with treats) Coco knew he didn't like it. He was never really claustrophobic before hand though.
I'm not saying don't try a kennel! I'm saying start slow and be patient bc it might take some time!! :D
 

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I think a crate could be helpful but only if you take the crate-training slow. I use plastic crates because they're more "den"-like but you can get the same effect with a blanket over a wire crate :).

Just keep in mind that it'll be a while before you can actually shut him into the crate. Google "crate-training" to get some tips. You usually start by having the cage open, feeding meals in there, putting special toys and bones in there, etc. :) Then you'd shut him in but immediately let him out, increasing the time he spends crated (but with occasional short times).

Get a bunch of puzzle toys that you can put in the crate (rotate them) :). Kongs (there are a bunch of kinds) are great for this because they're small and don't require a lot of room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think a crate could be helpful but only if you take the crate-training slow. I use plastic crates because they're more "den"-like but you can get the same effect with a blanket over a wire crate :).

Just keep in mind that it'll be a while before you can actually shut him into the crate. Google "crate-training" to get some tips. You usually start by having the cage open, feeding meals in there, putting special toys and bones in there, etc. :) Then you'd shut him in but immediately let him out, increasing the time he spends crated (but with occasional short times).

Get a bunch of puzzle toys that you can put in the crate (rotate them) :). Kongs (there are a bunch of kinds) are great for this because they're small and don't require a lot of room.
. Spezza doesn't like toys he has a bunch but doesn't care about them is there something else I can put in his cage ? I know this sounds weird but he rather play with his blankets then toys
 

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. Spezza doesn't like toys he has a bunch but doesn't care about them is there something else I can put in his cage ? I know this sounds weird but he rather play with his blankets then toys
What kind of toys have you tried? I'm talking about the ones you can hide treats in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
What kind of toys have you tried? I'm talking about the ones you can hide treats in.
I have a knog and one of those ball things u can put treats in it doesn't interest him he also has balls stuffed animals blankets and tug of war thing the one thing he plays with is his blankets
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Maybe tie the blankets up in knots, inside the knots place a treat and then he can pick at the blanket to get the treat?
I love this idea :) I'm gonna try it thanks
 

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A crate will be helpful but a lot of work also goes into that, especially if you want the dog to see it as a safe place. A dog who already has seperation anxiety and is popped into a crate and then you leave is NOT going to make the dog think of that crate as a safe place. Leaving a dog with bad seperation anxiety is likes like pouring spiders on someone with arachnophobia. I suggest looking up good books on seperation anxiety in dogs and reading about it.

Rescue Remedy is a good idea and so is a big Kong with peanut butter and treats stuffed in there.

The type of crate is going to depend on your dog. A wire crate may make him feel safer because he can see his surroundings and see YOU when you are training him to accept the crate as a safe place. However, a plastic crate may make him feel safer because it is a dark, enclosed space that is his own. A lot of crate training and making him think the crate is not bad at all so he does not associate it with you leaving or even better, so he associates the crate with you leaving and it being OK since it is his safe place, is going to be absolutely essential before leaving him in the crate while you're gone. Otherwise it could create more issues. So leave the crate open with a comfy bed and lead him in there. Praise and treats. Lead him in and close the door. Praise and treats. Gradually leave him in the crate for longer periods of time, praise and treats, Kong and bones. He may take to it right away and hop right in there. It all depends on the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A crate will be helpful but a lot of work also goes into that, especially if you want the dog to see it as a safe place. A dog who already has seperation anxiety and is popped into a crate and then you leave is NOT going to make the dog think of that crate as a safe place. Leaving a dog with bad seperation anxiety is likes like pouring spiders on someone with arachnophobia. I suggest looking up good books on seperation anxiety in dogs and reading about it.

Rescue Remedy is a good idea and so is a big Kong with peanut butter and treats stuffed in there.

The type of crate is going to depend on your dog. A wire crate may make him feel safer because he can see his surroundings and see YOU when you are training him to accept the crate as a safe place. However, a plastic crate may make him feel safer because it is a dark, enclosed space that is his own. A lot of crate training and making him think the crate is not bad at all so he does not associate it with you leaving or even better, so he associates the crate with you leaving and it being OK since it is his safe place, is going to be absolutely essential before leaving him in the crate while you're gone. Otherwise it could create more issues. So leave the crate open with a comfy bed and lead him in there. Praise and treats. Lead him in and close the door. Praise and treats. Gradually leave him in the crate for longer periods of time, praise and treats, Kong and bones. He may take to it right away and hop right in there. It all depends on the dog.
thanks but i already resolved this issue with his crate, also spezza doesnt like toys or treats hes an old man but thanks for trying to help
 
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