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Betta Bomb
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:p After reading your post in Nibbler's thread Im scared to death of giving birth now. Thanks :p If I was to have kids it will be in a few years after I get my career flighted. I liked the idea of midwives in olde Newfoundland bc you're surrounded by people who love and support you, rather than hospital strangers. And I hate the idea of epidural bc anything regarding the spine and its fluid creeps me out big time, and given that the spine is crucial to the central nervous system I wouldn't want to puncture that. *eww.
But I cannot say anything bc I've never had to give birth. I'd say a lot of strangers flashing their PhD certificates in my face and not listen to my opinion on MY baby would make me want to scream.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I never had an epidural. I had a low-dose painkiller during my transitional phase because I was getting very irritated and frustrated at all the questions all the birthing staff were popping at me when I was trying to focus, and it did help take the edge off and help me regain my focus. I can't help but think maybe our baby's heart wouldn't have stopped after birth had I not taken any drugs, and especially not during such a crucial period, but laboring mamas don't think of any consequences because the birthing staff is stressing them out so much, :/

Thing is, you CAN give birth the way you want to in a hospital. ...But getting the birthing staff to easily agree to it is NOT easy. And that's just even more stress which is why next time, I'd rather give birth in a birthing center or give birth at home. I didn't want to do Fetal Monitoring, because the technology is shifty, and something as little as the baby shifting positions makes the doctors go:
"OMGZDANGERYOUNEEDACSECTIONNAO!!" But I figured I could deal with it so long as it meant they left me alone. I didn't want to be hooked up an IV, so I opted for a Hep-Lock instead, which does come in handy if you decide you need just a little dose of something to get you through the rest of the way. I refused an episiotomy much to the displeasure of everyone except my fiance, due to episiotomy cons that I've read.

There's theory that PPD can be because of the baby immediately being put on mama's chest after birth. Apparently in indigenous societies the mama will give birth, lean back, and take a breath before deciding when to pick up her baby. SHE makes the decision when to accept responsibility as the mother, instead of having the responsibility thrust upon her after such an ordeal as birth. I think there's definite truth there, because after I gave birth, since they had to rush him off to restart his heart anyway, I didn't get to hold him until I REALLY wanted to, which had only been a few seconds. I never had PPD, so I definitely think that may be a major way around developing it.

To boot, the hospital hooked me up to Pitocin without my consent(I was still reeling from having given birth that I didn't even notice they had until I went into the bathroom and saw that there was a bag attached to my IV pole) to make sure my uterus was still contracting enough to expell the placenta. Apparently hospitals have a time limit. Placenta should be out in 15 minutes or less or they start getting worried. I've read homebirth stories where it took longer than that; hours, a couple days even I think, and the woman was perfectly fine. It all varies. But hospitals want routine, routine, routine! Not variables!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
So I've been emailing a woman that wrote a book on Unassisted Childbirth, and asked her if she thought it was possible my baby's heart stopped after birth due to the stress that the birthing staff caused me during labor and pushing.. She thought so. Apparently she also found research that said if strangers enter a room where a pregnant monkey is housed, her fetus' heart rate will go down. Afterall, if stress can induce a heart attack in adults, can cause a miscarriage during pregnancy, then stress can induce a newborn's heart attack. This is one of the many side-effects that can occur since birth has moved out of the home and into the hospital. Maternal and infant death rate has skyrocketed, along with all their other lousy interventions and their own list of side-effects from giving birth supine, early cord clamping, constant cervical checks, stripping the membranes, breaking the waters.. Stressing the laboring mama out to the point her infant has a heart attack. That, along with my son's fever after birth which they also couldn't find a reason for(I didn't have a fever - they tested me several times, he had no infection, spinal tap came up negative, etc).

The only "inherently dangerous" thing about childbirth is medical intervention and the stress of birthing in an environment that's unnatural to our species. I've never witnessed any pets or any animals give birth, but I do know you leave them alone so they don't get stressed out. The same can't be applied to humans? For humans a bunch of strangers must gather to watch, poke, prod, and shout out suggestions? Unfair.
 
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