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Could someone help me?! I'm just about at wits end.... I had to move in with a friend of mine, I have a very small room that I share with my cat. She does not go outside and she some how managed to get fleas!! Unfortunately my money situation has took a turn for the worse and I can't afford frontline or anything of the sort. I don't want to get pesticides either because of it being such a small area I know it will effect her and myself... Can someone please provide me ANY advice how I can get rid of these bugs without resorting to pesticides.... Someone suggested dawn dish soap and giving her a bath..... Would a flea collar really work? I would assume it would only protect her neck. Thank you!!!
 

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You may have to shell out some money... its hard to get around it with fleas.

I would get a capstar for her they are about $10 for one at a vet, that will kill all fleas on her, but you will need flea spray and vacuum and wash everything.
 

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Aw I'm sorry. Fleas are no fun.

Frontline and other topical flea treatments you buy at a vet are pesticides as well, just thought I would mention. Flea collars contain pesticides as well, or else how would they kill fleas? Really almost every product you get for the purpose of killing insects can be classified as a pesticide by the definition of the word. It doesn't necessarily have to be a nasty chemical like everyone thinks of when they think of the word.

Really I understand that you said you are not in a good financial situation but honestly the best flea treatments are the kinds you can get from the vet. Frontline doesn't work well in my area anymore (fleas in some areas are becoming immune to it) but there are other options out there.

Basically you could spend the money on other products, but they don't usually work half as well as the kind you get from the vet and some of them are even more dangerous. You'd probably end up spending more money in the long run because you'd first buy cheaper products that didn't work, then you'd still have to go back and buy the more expensive things that do work if you want to get rid of the fleas.

Make sure to keep the environment clean - wash anything you can like blankets and stuff like that and vacuum a lot. Some people do report success at removing fleas with Dawn if you bath the animal in it but that of course won't do anything for the fleas and flea eggs in the room, just the ones that are actually on the cat at the time. Food grade Diatomaceous Earth (make sure it's food grade) kills fleas, is pretty cheap, and is not harmful to humans or animals other than insects even if ingested. It's a powder, so you could use it to dust your rugs and stuff like that then vacuum it up again.

But honestly yeah fleas can be tough to completely get rid of depending on how bad the infestation is now and I usually just recommend getting one of the vet recommended products like Advantage.
 

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Betta Bomb
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Flea collars SHOULD NEVER EVER EVER be put on a cat!!! (or dog for that matter) Most cats have a reaction to them, people can touch them and put their hands in their mouth, they're often ineffective in total flea control bc it's only skin surface reactive (which means the fleas just move to another part of the body, typically the base of the tail)... Ugh. Such a nasty easy-to-obtain product!

The only thing a flea collar is good for is placing in your vacuum bag (or compartment) and then if any fleas or eggs are sucked up they'll die.

Fleas eggs are usually fertilized and lay around by the corners of walls and in the seams of bedding where the animal sleeps.. The best thing you can do for these areas is sprinkle salt all over. The salt dried up the eggs. After a day vacuum it all up.
 

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Bathing them in Dawn; using Diatomaceous Earth to dust the carpet.. you can also buy cheap flea collars from the dollar store and put them into the vacuum bag/canister when you vacuum, so instead of vacuuming up fleas and dumping live fleas out into the garbage bag, you'll vacuum up fleas and dump them dead into the garbage bag. Vacuum - thoroughly - at least every other day, and make sure there is NO clutter. Fleas love to hide where it is dark and cluttered. You can also turn the thermostat down. Fleas breed and the eggs hatch more quickly when it's warm. If the environment is colder, you might be able to nip their population in the butt before it gets too out of control.

Also, I thought I'd mention. Fleas are the type of creatures where you can think you got them out of control, and then one day out of the blue they're "back again". I think I read fleas can survive a year without a food source. So even if you don't see any more fleas, don't slack. Keep vacuuming every day for a while just to be extra certain.
 

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Curmudgeon
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+1 for Diatomaceous Earth.

Just make sure you get the kind that is safe for animals. The filtration kind can cause lung disease in animals, ...and humans.

Bob
 

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Also for getting flea treatments like topicals etc from vets, some vets will sell flea supplies in single doses. So you can buy a month or two supply at a time instead of buying a whole 6 or 12 month supply. That should help you save some money.

At least my vet does that. Works well for me because I don't use flea preventative on my dog normally, but I like to keep a month or twos supply of it around just in case I find any fleas on my dog.
 
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