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Curmudgeon
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We don't often think of Hamsters as being endangered animals:
21 January 2011 Last updated at 07:39 ET
A top EU legal adviser has warned the French government that it must do more to protect endangered hamsters living near Strasbourg in eastern France.

France could be fined if the European Court of Justice rules that it has failed to heed a final warning from the European Commission in 2008.

Numbers of Great Hamsters of Alsace are dwindling. The Commission says only 298 burrows were found in 2010, down from 1,167 in 2001.

Check this link on the BBC for the whole article.

Bob
 

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I read the article and it was interesting. All we have to do is look to the Amazon to see what happens when animal species are not protected properly.
 

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I didn't know until recently that all golden (syrian) hamsters in the pet trade all come from one female found in the wild, she was captured and she was pregnant, she gave birth, and all golden hamsters come from that one litter, they've never found any more in the wild since or the male that made her pregant...how strange :S
 

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I didn't know until recently that all golden (syrian) hamsters in the pet trade all come from one female found in the wild, she was captured and she was pregnant, she gave birth, and all golden hamsters come from that one litter, they've never found any more in the wild since or the male that made her pregant...how strange :S
That is incorrect, they did manage to capture and keep a female ALIVE whom was pregnant and brought from the desert but they most certainly still live there. They where domesticated for centuries and began to look like the Syrian Hamster we know now. They are an endangered species, but not extinct. :hehe:
 

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Resident Zoologist
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That is incorrect, they did manage to capture and keep a female ALIVE whom was pregnant and brought from the desert but they most certainly still live there. They where domesticated for centuries and began to look like the Syrian Hamster we know now. They are an endangered species, but not extinct. :hehe:
Actually both incorrect. The original Syrian hamsters were captured by a British team in 1938, and most pets come from an original six. A second group (of, I believe, 5) was captured in the 1970's by an American. All pet Syrian hamsters can trace their genetics back to these 11 wild specimens.

However, the hamsters referred to in this article are Cricetus cricetus, a very different species than the commonly kept pet Syrian hamster, Mesocricetus auratus.
 

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Actually both incorrect. The original Syrian hamsters were captured by a British team in 1938, and most pets come from an original six. A second group (of, I believe, 5) was captured in the 1970's by an American. All pet Syrian hamsters can trace their genetics back to these 11 wild specimens.

However, the hamsters referred to in this article are Cricetus cricetus, a very different species than the commonly kept pet Syrian hamster, Mesocricetus auratus.
I learned that in 1839 a British zoologist named George Robert Waterhouse was the one who found them.
 

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From what I've heard on the news recently, France is not going to do much to prevent the hamsters from dying off.
 

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Resident Zoologist
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I learned that in 1839 a British zoologist named George Robert Waterhouse was the one who found them.
Correct...that was the holotype for the species...however is was not until nearly for decades later that viable live specimens were brought into the UK, and that bloodline was all dead by 1910. It was another 20 years until live specimens left Syria again, and the handful exported that time were the progenitors of the current pet-stock.
 

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Zoo Keeper
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Thats sad. As much as I hate putting animals in captivity the wild european hamsters are so cool esp the ones with black bellies :D
 

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Zoo Keeper
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thats not what I meant stop making trouble.
 

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thats not what I meant stop making trouble.
#1 It's not a big deal I was poking fun
#2 I'm not making trouble
#3 All European Hamsters have black bellies

the wild european hamsters are so cool esp the ones with black bellies
That is what you meant because that's what you said. :rolleyes:
 

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Zoo Keeper
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take it how you want I am tired of the trouble. I forgot a line but its not worth the trouble.
 

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[**||Seahorse Chick||**]
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Slightly off topic, but so glad we don't have an EU Commission in the US. I feel like a country should have their own say in what they do. It might seem like sense to a point, but that line can get crossed so easily. France's economy isn't that great right now and farmers should grow what makes sense. These hamsters ought to be moved or have some raised in captivity to increase their numbers - it doesn't make sense to pause modern life as it is to protect a species, especially farming - it makes more sense to place a species where it will thrive naturally with the changing world around it. Designate an area or reserve, but don't force the farmers to grow alfalfa.
 

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Curmudgeon
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Some people don't believe that agriculture is more important than wildlife.

Moving populations is neither easy, nor is it often successful. That is why is almost never even attempted.

As a people, folks have to decide whether they want a world with or without wild animals.

If you want wild animals, sometimes (just like everything in life) there have to be sacrifices.

Thanks to modern agricultural technology, farmers can grow food in a large variety of habitats and environments. The same can not be said for some rare species of animals.

I'm willing to pay a little more at the market for my food and keep wild animals in the world.

Bob
 

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[**||Seahorse Chick||**]
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I think it's a short term solution to a long term problem. As our civilization matures, there will be species caught in the cross-fire. And they can either adapt or go extinct. If they are precious enough for people to want to save them, then people will find a way to save them. I just don't think people should force other people to work around them. It's not good for the people being forced and it's not good for the species that is not being forced to adapt and live alongside us - instead they will always be vulnerable and someday when a law is revoked and people move on with daily life as usual, the change will happen at once and it could wipe them out because they have not had to adapt.
 

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Betta Bomb
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I couldn't fathom the idea of having a "wild hamster" problem in which they become as destructive as mice getting into the house and stealing food and all that.
 
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