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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
the whole point behind even mentioning that taking her to a vet was not an option was to try to get some advice and opinions as an alternative to the vet, not to get judged for my home-life situation. i don't see why you think you should interject your opinions about my situation when all you are doing is passing judgment rather than helping. how is you telling me that you think that what i'm doing is not good enough or that i shouldn't have chinchillas if i am not able to use a vet an answer to the question about the tail in the first place. it's not going to help anything with the tail and it's not going to change the fact that i have chinchillas and i am unable to go to a vet. you saying things aren't good enough and basically attacking my home life when i am asking for advice on how to naturally heal the chinchilla doesn't do anything except piss me off. i'm guessing that this isn't the only time you have done so either. if the question doesn't ask for an opinion you shouldn't be going off with your own negative beliefs. everyone knows that if you don't have anything nice to say you shouldn't say anything at all.
 

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Although everything seems to be fine with your girl, I would still check the wound very often to make sure that it's not infected because, just like humans, infection can happen at anytime, quickly. This is what I would do:
1. Trim back the hair near the wound so that you can properly see the edges of the actual wound (only a few centimeters of trimming)
2. Signs of infection will be the same as humans - if the area is red and swollen, smalls bad, is oozy or hot then that is a pretty good sign there is an infection starting.
3. If everything looks ok (no redness) I would make sure that there wasn't any dried blood or anything on the wound and if there were I would take a moist towel to remove anything covering the wound.
4. As I'm sure you know, chins hide pain very well which means that unless the wound is being monitored very often, chances are your chin won't show illness until its too late
5. I don't know what to do if there is an infection as the chin would need immediate antibiotics and only vets can proscribe medication. All I know is that they are tiny animals and an infection can take them down in no time.

Again, this is what I would do if I were not able to go to the vet. Since this has been going on for a few weeks, your chin's wound should be healed. If it's not, chances are an infection has occurred.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
thanks! i'm checking her twice a day to make sure nothing new is happening. she pulled off all of the hair so it is really easy to monitor it. it seems like more and more of the scabs are falling off every day, it's almost all skin now and the hair is just starting to grow back.
the breeder i use does have antibiotics on hand, she goes down to mexico (about an hour drive from here) and buys it. i get a new bottle from her every 6 months so i always have some on hand in case of an infection. right after she did it there were some signs of infection but the antibiotics cleared it up and it seems like everything is fine now. she is acting completely happy and normal again.
 

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I'm glad that she is happy. I just need to say one thing and its only because I'm a nursing student :giggle:

Please, please, please be careful of what you're giving your delicate chin, especially if they're not being proscribed by a licensed physician with a background in pharmacology. In the future I would call a vet, if you can't go in that's one thing, but they will always talk to you and can tell you what is a good medication etc. I know the "cillin" (penicillin, etc.) is NOT good for them and is commonly used in human infection. Baytril can be overdosed quickly, so just be careful. A vet could also tell you how long they need to be on the antibiotics because it varies by medication. This is extremely important as not giving enough can create a "super bug" and giving too much can kill the digestive flora which will kill the chin, possibly.

Oh and another thing I wanted to mention - if you need to bandage her again, make sure to not use any tape. Adhesive is toxic to them and can possibly degrade their system.
 

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I'm glad that she is happy. I just need to say one thing and its only because I'm a nursing student :giggle:

Please, please, please be careful of what you're giving your delicate chin, especially if they're not being proscribed by a licensed physician with a background in pharmacology. In the future I would call a vet, if you can't go in that's one thing, but they will always talk to you and can tell you what is a good medication etc. I know the "cillin" (penicillin, etc.) is NOT good for them and is commonly used in human infection. Baytril can be overdosed quickly, so just be careful. A vet could also tell you how long they need to be on the antibiotics because it varies by medication. This is extremely important as not giving enough can create a "super bug" and giving too much can kill the digestive flora which will kill the chin, possibly.

Oh and another thing I wanted to mention - if you need to bandage her again, make sure to not use any tape. Adhesive is toxic to them and can possibly degrade their system.


I agree with you, Janelle.


Oral Baytril also effects the appetite. If you ever need to use that, like Janelle said, it can be easily overdosed, but make sure you have the proper dose. Also, make sure you have some Oxbow Critical Care on hand for when he/she stops eating, you'll need to step in and handfeed until he/she starts eating on its own. Injected Baytril does not have this effect but I do not recommend it from a non-lisenced vet.


Just a heads up.
 

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I'm not weird, I'm gifted
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I told you what I think is wrong with her.

If the flesh has started to die, you may end up with a chinchilla with a mild blood posining...

I'm sorry that I'm pissing you off, but you are pissing me off to.
We try to take care of our animals in here...

I'm just glad I live in a land, where this sort of thing is not accepted...
 

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ok, seriously chinchi, STOP being so rude! I'm so tired of reading your aggressive and offensive posts. before you post, read what you've written then imagine someone talking to you like that. I mean really, come on, this is quite enough. there are much more polite ways to STILL get your point across, learn some tact.
 

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I'm not weird, I'm gifted
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Apparently not...

I'm so sick of people just hiding behind nice words in here.

This is just not good enough.

I'm sure she really loves her animals, and would do anything to help them. Somethimes, that's just not enough!
 

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she seems to be ok now, it's like she just didn't want the tip of her tail or something. i finished the course of antibiotics and the infection is completely gone. she is back with her friend and is really happy. she chewed the very tip off and then was done with it. strange but at least it all worked out in the end.
I know it's been a long time, but I was wondering what happened to your chin? Did her hair grow back? Did she continue chewing? I have a chinchilla that has started to do this and we don't have any vets in our area.
 
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