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I am afraid I haven't treated my new sugar glider properly and may have caused him to never want to bond. I started off completely wrong when getting him, I had two sugar gliders when I was a kid and honestly didn't realize how much of the work my parents actually did while they were joeys. I first made the mistake of bringing him to my apartment which is currently full of my five college roommates. This wouldn't have been a problem because I have made sure to keep him in my room but at the worst time my manager caught mono causing me to have to work all day everyday. This means I have had to leave him all day in my room where my roommates have been always keeping him awake and pulling him out of his cage even when I tell them to never do that.
I know that during the first month of having a joey I need to take every step slow and do everything perfectly right but that sadly hasn't happened. I could really use any advise that could help me reverse all the wrong that has been done and help me be able to bond and allow this little guy to live a long happy life!
 

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Here is a picture my roommate took of my little guy.

I thought everyone might also like to see a picture of my little joey.
 

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Don't give up!

Try starting over with your glider. Just take it slow. Get a bonding pouch, one that breathes but zips close, and carry the pouch around with you whenever you can. Is it possible for you to take a pouch to work? If not, just do it whenever you can at night. Don't force the glider out.

When you are able to be alone in a room that is safe for your glider to jump around, open the cage/pouch and let him/her come out when ready. Some suggest getting a small pop up tent and sitting in there during bonding time, giving your glider a chance to get used to your scent and learn you won't hurt it.

Hand feeding treats to your glider is a great way to bond. Freeze dried mealworms work great! Just make sure not to over do it on whatever treat you decide. Ideally, the glider will have to touch and smell your hand to get the treat.

It is imperative that you stop your roommates from bothering your glider, especially during the day. This is when they sleep - imagine someone constantly yanking you out of bed in the middle of the night! In order to build trust, your glider needs its privacy. Put a lock on the cage door, if you have to. Your glider may become depressed and develop behavioral problems.

Do you have only one glider? While they can live happy and healthy while alone, they do best with a partner. Consider getting another glider so they can socialize and keep each other company while you are away. There may be times when you have to be away, and your glider will suffer if it does not have someone to be with.

They are a lot of work, especially during the bonding time. But don't worry, once you get into a routine with your glider and learn the ins and outs, it becomes easier and it will be a wonderful companion!

Continue doing research into the cares of a sugar glider - it will give you better guidelines on how to work with your glider.

Best of luck! Keep us posted!
 
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