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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok listen, im a begining mouse breeder,
my problem is.....

...last thursday i bought two mice,
a white and cream, and they said it was male,
and a grey and black, which waz supposed to be a female,
(and i got them so their litter would be colorful)

they were doing fine until today i went and bought another female,
all light brown,
and the "male" started to bite her and she was bleeding,
so i put her in another cage with the other "female"
and they get along,
i went online and did some research, and found how to sex them,
(girls have nipples)
(the boys have their anus and rectum further from eachother)

so i sexed them,
and found out the grey "female" was a male and had no nipples,
the "male" didnt have nipples but his privates were more closer together than the gray one's,
and the brown one has nipples but its privates are sort of in between the other two's


so if any1 could help me on another way or give me advice that would be great, thx!!!!
 

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RAT ADDICT
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I gave you a longer reply in your other thread.

Can you post pictures of the mice privates? Males can often suck their testicles in,usually when nervous and this can prove quite difficult to sex mice properly.
 

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Official Loofah Tester
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ok listen, im a begining mouse breeder,
my problem is.....

...last thursday i bought two mice,
a white and cream, and they said it was male,
and a grey and black, which waz supposed to be a female,
(and i got them so their litter would be colorful)

they were doing fine until today i went and bought another female,
all light brown,
and the "male" started to bite her and she was bleeding,
so i put her in another cage with the other "female"
and they get along,
i went online and did some research, and found how to sex them,
(girls have nipples)
(the boys have their anus and rectum further from eachother)

so i sexed them,
and found out the grey "female" was a male and had no nipples,
the "male" didnt have nipples but his privates were more closer together than the gray one's,
and the brown one has nipples but its privates are sort of in between the other two's


so if any1 could help me on another way or give me advice that would be great, thx!!!!

I'm assuming, since you're just learning how to sex them that you have never owned mice before. If I'm way off base on my assumption, and you are more knowledgeable and committed than this post presents, feel free to ignore my assumptions and comments. :)

Though mice are relatively low maintenance and "easy" to breed, breeding is the easy part. Caring for litters takes commitment. I would slow down, do a little honest soul searching, and answer a few of the following questions:

Why do you want to get into breeding?

For profit? You will spend more in their care than any profit you could ever make.
For fun and experience? You will need to be willing to be the one to provide a healthy and happy home for all 20 of your baby mice.

Litters range from 1-20 pups, assuming you only breed them once. Multiple breeding will very quickly net you that x the number of pairings make.

Failing you providing a good home yourself, are you willing to spend hours a week for possibly months screening and finding quality homes for them so that they don't end up as snake food, pet store fodder, or worse?

Do you wish to be an ethical breeder who puts the welfare of the lives you create first, or will they be 'disposable' lives?
Are you willing to do the research to become an ethical breeder?

In my opinion owning a pet simply requires love and care. Making the active decision to breed an animal should require a serious level of commitment in your mind since it isn't just caring, it's contributing to the (over)population. It's like the difference between being a store patron, and a store owner. The latter requires a much greater commitment to the store in question.

If you can answer these questions with satisfaction that you are doing best by these future animals and have their needs first in your heart, then by all means go for it once you have educated yourself.

I can give you some of the most basic mice knowledge. I have more knowledge than I'm sharing, but because I'm not 100 percent on the accuracy, I won't be sharing it all. Just what I'm sure of. I'm not a breeder, so you will need to research this further.

1) Male mice must be housed in isolation unless they are actively being paired for a litter. Males housed together will kill each other in very short order. And males housed with females will lead to a massive population explosion within one month.

Cage requirements: 1 cage per male mouse. 3-4 females per 10 gallon tank with a mesh lid.

2) Males /stink/. As has been posted elsewhere by another mouse fancier, her 1 male mouse smelled worse than a tank full of female mice put together.


3) Don't keep your mice on wire floors. They will need smooth surfaces with bedding. And NEVER keep a breeding female on a wire floor: The babies will fall through or get caught and killed.

4) Never use pine or ceder bedding. The phenols in them are toxic to rodents. Aspin works well as an alternative.

5) Once a female is bred, remove the male. A female comes into heat immediately upon delivery of her pups and can become pregnant right away if a male is present.


Best of luck in figuring out what's right for you and the mice you've brought into your life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm assuming, since you're just learning how to sex them that you have never owned mice before. If I'm way off base on my assumption, and you are more knowledgeable and committed than this post presents, feel free to ignore my assumptions and comments. :)

Though mice are relatively low maintenance and "easy" to breed, breeding is the easy part. Caring for litters takes commitment. I would slow down, do a little honest soul searching, and answer a few of the following questions:

Why do you want to get into breeding?

For profit? You will spend more in their care than any profit you could ever make.
For fun and experience? You will need to be willing to be the one to provide a healthy and happy home for all 20 of your baby mice.

Litters range from 1-20 pups, assuming you only breed them once. Multiple breeding will very quickly net you that x the number of pairings make.

Failing you providing a good home yourself, are you willing to spend hours a week for possibly months screening and finding quality homes for them so that they don't end up as snake food, pet store fodder, or worse?

Do you wish to be an ethical breeder who puts the welfare of the lives you create first, or will they be 'disposable' lives?
Are you willing to do the research to become an ethical breeder?

In my opinion owning a pet simply requires love and care. Making the active decision to breed an animal should require a serious level of commitment in your mind since it isn't just caring, it's contributing to the (over)population. It's like the difference between being a store patron, and a store owner. The latter requires a much greater commitment to the store in question.

If you can answer these questions with satisfaction that you are doing best by these future animals and have their needs first in your heart, then by all means go for it once you have educated yourself.

I can give you some of the most basic mice knowledge. I have more knowledge than I'm sharing, but because I'm not 100 percent on the accuracy, I won't be sharing it all. Just what I'm sure of. I'm not a breeder, so you will need to research this further.

1) Male mice must be housed in isolation unless they are actively being paired for a litter. Males housed together will kill each other in very short order. And males housed with females will lead to a massive population explosion within one month.

Cage requirements: 1 cage per male mouse. 3-4 females per 10 gallon tank with a mesh lid.

2) Males /stink/. As has been posted elsewhere by another mouse fancier, her 1 male mouse smelled worse than a tank full of female mice put together.


3) Don't keep your mice on wire floors. They will need smooth surfaces with bedding. And NEVER keep a breeding female on a wire floor: The babies will fall through or get caught and killed.

4) Never use pine or ceder bedding. The phenols in them are toxic to rodents. Aspin works well as an alternative.

5) Once a female is bred, remove the male. A female comes into heat immediately upon delivery of her pups and can become pregnant right away if a male is present.


Best of luck in figuring out what's right for you and the mice you've brought into your life.
ok thx
i hav the "females" in a tank
and the "male" in a cage
and i use toilet paper as bedding(clean of course)
 

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Hello Earthling
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from petco:tonguerol
Why are you breeding them then? Mice form pet stores are meant to be food for snakes and other reptiles. They have terrible genetics and are most likely inbreed.

I seriously think you should learn before you start breeding and purchases breeding quality mice form a breeder.

What is the EXACT reason you are breeding?
 

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Oy! What Canadian Critter said: Get quality mice first!

I looked at your profile and see that you are young. I don't think that being young means you shouldn't breed, but do seriously consider what you are doing.

You stated in your profile that you are interested in breeding all different kinds of animals. That's fine in theory. Just don't do it all at once, and please, please, please be willing to do the footwork to be as responsible as you can.

You will find that this board, and really any other board I've been on, takes the responsibility of breeding very seriously, and will not look kindly on anyone who doesn't make the effort to do what is best for the animals. You'll read that in other posts where pet owners have repeatedly made irresponsible decisions. Don't be like one of them. :scare:

Here is a site to start with: http://www.thefunmouse.com/info/breeding.cfm
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oy! What Canadian Critter said: Get quality mice first!

I looked at your profile and see that you are young. I don't think that being young means you shouldn't breed, but do seriously consider what you are doing.

You stated in your profile that you are interested in breeding all different kinds of animals. That's fine in theory. Just don't do it all at once, and please, please, please be willing to do the footwork to be as responsible as you can.

You will find that this board, and really any other board I've been on, takes the responsibility of breeding very seriously, and will not look kindly on anyone who doesn't make the effort to do what is best for the animals. You'll read that in other posts where pet owners have repeatedly made irresponsible decisions. Don't be like one of them. :scare:

Here is a site to start with: http://www.thefunmouse.com/info/breeding.cfm
i hav read that entire website back and fowarth
same w/ alot of others
 

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Official Loofah Tester
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...and you know you won't make any kind of profit from breeding any kind of animal? Not unless you are abusive to your stock?
 

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Official Loofah Tester
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wat do u mean?
i need to be abusive?
wat?
Meaning, that everyone who gets into breeding, knows that they will not make a profit in it. No matter what they breed. They end up doing it for other motivations, like love and betterment of the animals, because they sure will never make a profit. Breeding animals in healthy, humane conditions requires more money than anyone can make from them. The best that can be hoped for is that they can partially off-set the cost of keeping them.

The kinds of people who manage to turn a profit, only do so by mass breeding in inhumane conditions. This is a proven fact.

So, yes, what I am saying is that if your motivation is to turn a buck, then the only way you will make your profit is to sacrifice the welfare of your animals.
 

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..Don't breed because you want to...breed because you have a good idea in mind, like to better than genetics, that's one that I'm always pleased to hear about.

I think you should seriously take a couple years if not more of just pet mice ownership before even considering breeding. Learn their quirks, habits, genetics, behaviors....you can't even sex them properly - what's gonna happen if your mice have a litter or two, and you, being ill-informed, place males in with females, or vice versa for the long run? You'll have hundreds of inbred mice and no idea what to do with them all.

I'm not a breeder, but that's just my advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Meaning, that everyone who gets into breeding, knows that they will not make a profit in it. No matter what they breed. They have to do it for other motivations, like love and betterment of the animals. Breeding animals in healthy, humane conditions requires more money than anyone can make from them. The best that can be hoped for is that they can partially off-set the cost of keeping them.

The kinds of people who manage to turn a profit, only do so by mass breeding in inhumane conditions. This is a proven fact.

So, yes, what I am saying is that if your motivation is to turn a buck, then the only way you will make your profit is to sacrifice the welfare of your animals.
wat does "welfare" mean?
 

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Hello Earthling
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the good fortune, health, happiness, prosperity, etc., of a person, group, or organization; well-being: to look after a child's welfare; the physical or moral welfare of society
 

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y is that ridiculous?
Because if you'd read the site you would have already read that using pet store stock means using stock that is guaranteed to have health and/or genetic behavioral issues. Hence, to choose to do so knowing that, is ridiculous. Make sense?
 

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Okay. I'm no expert, and I don't pretend to be either. But even I know that you are STUPID. You want your mice to be happy and healthy, yes? Then DON'T BREED THEM.
 
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