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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
please help
my bearded [lynx] has not eaten any food for over 2 weeks
he is 8yrs old and is getting skinny.he wont eat his veggies or crickets i would take him to vets but cant find any who know much about dragons.
we are trying to force feed him but dont know what else to do.
any help would be very apreciated
 

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The primary reason I see for beardies going off food is improper temperatures, namely, being too cold during the day. Their habitat should graduate from ~100F (~38C) under the basking light to ~85F (~29C) on the cold side of the cage. This allows them to move from hot to cold or in between as they need it. They also require UV lighting in addition to the heat, and an old UV light may not be putting out the necessary UV for calcium metabolism. Fluorescent bulbs have a fairly short life span (at least for putting out adequate UV) and should be replaced fairly often. Mercury vapor bulbs last a lot longer.

If he's losing weight in only two weeks, though, I would think that there is something else going on than just lighting/heat. Was his appetite low prior to going completely off of food? Other issues may be a concern, such as impaction (from accidentally ingesting cage substrate) or internal parasites... or perhaps he isn't actually a he and may be egg bound? All things that you should probably find a vet for. If you find a vet that will see your beardie, but doesn't know a lot about them, you might suggest that he consult with another vet who knows more. The joy of phones and the internet - it makes consultations very easy. :) At the very least, any vet with a rudimentary knowledge of reptiles should be able to do a basic exam and a fecal check.

You have to be careful with force feeding, one to avoid hurting him by trying to force open his mouth to get food in, and two to avoid stressing him and possibly making the problem worse. I prefer not to force feed unless I have absolutely no other choice.
 

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When my BD went thru a stage of not eating his crickets or vegetables..... I finger feed him natural baby food (fruit, veggies and meat) - try some bf meat for some protein tomorrow.

Pedialyte (for kids) is always a good fluid to give your BD via syringe during this time or worry.

Is your BD still having a BM? - if not try soaking him in a sink full of warm water... he could have become compacted, which will make him stop eating.

If you cannot find an exotic VET - I would take your BD to your own Vet - for some care is better than nothing when an animal is not eating.
Where do you live - maybe I can find a Vet for you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for your help
still having problems but trying every surgestion offerd
baby food is our next try,we did manage to syrynge some
water into him and he's still roaming around his tank, but still no intrested in food if he doesn't perk up in the next few days i will be taking him to my vet [we also have rabbits] who visit vets quite often.
thanks again
 

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What type of substrate are you using? It could be a impact issue. For it if he is able to pass it soak him in warm water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
he has sand for floor covering he is passing some poo but small amounts the food i am getting down him seems to be going straight through him.i have given him a soak in warm water and he did poop after but still not interested in food.he is still active but getting skinny,i think we will be taking him to my vets this week they dont know much about beardies i use them for my rabbits and degu but any vet is better than none i guess
thanks for your help
 

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Remove the sand immediately. It is both dangerous (impaction) and VERY dirty/unsanitary. Put him on paper towels or ceramic tiles...Beardies DONOT live on loose sand in the wild, they live on hard packed dirt, sand, and clay. The sand that they sell in petstore are very unsafe...would you like to live in a kitty litter box? and be forced to eat in it too...

Give him a Good long soak in very warm water 90F for at least 30 minutes, he's probably dehydrated from not eating. After you've soaked him let him warm up on a basking spot for 15-20 minutes, and then offer him some greens. If he doesn't start eating I would get him to a herp vet...
 

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I agree here too....... You need to remove the sand ASAP! - it is not good for their digestive tract when they accidentally swallow some of it when they catch their food.
 

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Sand is a big NO-NO! It can cause impacting and respitory infections in little ones. What part of the UK do you live?
 

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Yeah man remove the sand like a few people said if that stuff gets in him it will realy mess him up. Hes probly not eating because there is sand in him and its hurting his stumach or something.
 

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mine did the same thing...she was between 11 and 13 yrs old. we got some meds for anorexic reptiles. I have found the easiest way to open their mouths is w/ a credit card. please get the sand out. even the sand w/ calcium that they say is digestible isn't. Good luck. she still has a few good years in her if you get her past this.
 

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I second all of that, remove sand immediately, soak in warm water, force feed. I use the edge of a plastic spoon to pry mouths open gently. I've always like a mix of a meat flavored organic baby food, gatorade or pedialyte for electrolytes, vitamin supplement, and if you can stomach it, blended meal worms or wax worms.
Here is a link to a database of reptile vets in the UK, find one close to you immediately and take him in as soon as possible. Reptile Keeper - Reptile Vets
 

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definitely

Sand is terrible to have around at this age. As for force feeding, when all else fails you must. As for heating and uv lighting. Those are two important things two people don't take into consideration. I used to have trouble with deciding on proper uv lighting until I bought Zillas florescent bulbs, desert species 50 to be specific. I have not had problems since and my beardie seems to have perked up a bit. So try looking into different things around the environment that might need changing.
 

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I know its old but its interesting because it happened to me lol. I was wondering about sand too, though. How many people have actually experienced impaction. A lot say things about sand and stuff, but how many have actually gone through it from personal experience?

Or should I just post a new thread??
 

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You may want to post a new thread but not many here have beardies, so you may get limitted replies. However, i have not experienced this i don't have a dragon, but i have heard lots of horror stories, Bearded dragons do not live on loose sand in the wild and should not be on loose sand in captivity. They often scoop up food and scoop up sand along with it, and can't pass it. It builds up over time, so people that had their beardies for years, then they die and if they don't get a necropsy done they have no idea if they had been impacted.

It isn't needed for their cage, you can have a floor of better material such as tile, paper towels, newspaper, slate, or packing paper

NEVER use Calci-sand it is the worst product for substrate out there, it kills crickets, it makes stomach acid not work and will kill any reptile on it over time
 
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