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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi, i have just inherited 21 mice from 2 litters from my mom, as i have only kept 1 hamster (she died 2 months ago) i have a few questions..so here goes

first there are 2 litters, one set of 10 are about 8 weeks old they have been sexed and were all male they were in a tiny tank but i have seperated them as it was over crowded at the moment i have 6 in a crittertrail x is this too many? and also one of the mice seems to be the head of them but i saw him humping a smaller mouse and it has a bite mark on his back he seemed very scared so i picked him up and stroked him, is this ok it won't make the other mice dislike him?

the other 4 are in what was a fish tanki put them in my hamster cage but they escaped though the bars i caught 3 of them but i couldn't find the last one till the next day so about 24 hours i put him back in but again one seemed to squeek alot and chace him about and nibble at him is thi normal i did hear that you should not put them back after a few hours but i also heard that they get depressed if on their own? also is their anything apart from refined sugar that i should not feed them?

i also have the baby baby's there are 11 of these they are about 5 weeks old and all live together in a cagethat is 45 inces long by 30 widethey have one wheel and seem to get on but when do i need to seperate them? this sounds silly but they won't get upset at being seperated, they kept looking for they're mum when she was taken out,

also a random question to stop an argument, can mice from a cage be put in the wild, my freind says yes they will instinctively know what to do! i said NO because they are used to warm house and food being there and not a wide open space and not any other animal that might eat them and they would be sad and not understand (am i a dufus)

well thanks for reading and i hope you can help,
any more advice on making them happy would be great:):) xx
 

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The males may all have to be separated soon anyways to prevent fighting (even brothers often can't live together or at least need to be separated into a few groups/pairs). Females, however, can live in one big group as they're very social and rarely fight.

Yes, introducing a mouse back to a group can cause problems, especially with males. Males can live alone, by the way, and many have to. It's the females that you want to keep in groups or pairs.

Some other foods you should avoid are peanut butter (they can choke on it) and anything with caffeine. You also don't want to feed too many foods containing high amounts of protein (dog food, cat food, meat, etc.) or too much dairy. You might be able to find a complete list of unsafe foods on Google, I don't know one firsthand (one for rats will probably be about the same). If you can't find out whether a food is safe or not, don't feed it.

The babies should be separated now to avoid more pregnancies.

Domestic mice shouldn't ever be released into the wild, no. Not only is it illegal, but they wouldn't have learned some of the skills needed to survive in most cases. Also, domestic mice are often different colors than wild ones, making them easy targets and not allowing them to blend in (wild mice have a coloration called "agouti" which is a brownish coat).
 

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I'd re-sex that litter of 10 that are supposedly all males. That's pretty improbable - not impossible, but pretty unusual! :)

As for the males, attempt to re-home them unless you have a plethora of 5 gal. tanks and lids laying around. They will all probably need to be isolated from each other. IT's very rare that male mice can live together. They'll all need food dishes, water bottles/bowls, and preferably a little house and/or toys, so you can understand having so many iso-ed boys could be a hassle. Not to mention bedding expenses and the time it takes to get fresh food/water or change all those cages!

As for the females, they can live together in a size appropriate tank.

And no, domesticated mice should not be released. They come in too many colors that would reveal them to predators. You're right - they are also not 'trained' to find their own food or water, or to build a house in a safe spot, or to avoid predators. Mother mice teach their offspring this at young ages. Also, due to coddling, domesticated mice are not as hardy as wild mice and, if they crossbreed, would pass on poor genetics to wild mice, which could be disastrous to a population. Even though they're seen as 'vermin', think of how many wild animals depend on them as a food source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thnks for the advice it has helped alot they do seem to have calmed down for now but i doubt i'll be able to keep them for long and i don't think i'll be able to rehome them is there anywhere like the rspca in england that take in mice? and yes they have been sexed 4 times and they really are 10 males my dad said it's because there were lots of females and one male in the cage so she had lots of boys to even it out,

also if there is anyone in scarborugh area wanting mice i have some free lol
 
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