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Hey all :)

So hubby and I have been talking about getting a small dog in the future not right away.Im really interested in miniature pinschers and was wondering if anyone has experience with these breeds ? id love to hear about your personal experience.

Im not dead set on a pinscher so I would also like to hear about

everyones experiences with small dogs?
what there best experience with them ?
what was there worst experience as a small dog owner ?
Also what made them choose that type of small dog ?

:) Thanks
 

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Will this be your first dog? Sorry, I can't remember.

It's hard to generalize my experiences with "small dogs" as the breeds are so different from each other. I foster smaller dogs so I've had 20+ in my house :lol:.

As for Miniature Pinschers, they're fun little dogs but VERY high energy. They also aren't the easiest dogs to train...they're smart but you really have to keep them motivated and they get bored easily :lol:. They're independent and have a terrier-ish temperament. It's a breed that needs a lot of mental stimulation in addition to physical exercise.

If you're looking for breed recommendations, maybe post some things you're looking for in a dog and how small you want :). I'd also think about how much grooming you're up for, how much exercise you can provide, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Will this be your first dog? Sorry, I can't remember.

It's hard to generalize my experiences with "small dogs" as the breeds are so different from each other. I foster smaller dogs so I've had 20+ in my house :lol:.

As for Miniature Pinschers, they're fun little dogs but VERY high energy. They also aren't the easiest dogs to train...they're smart but you really have to keep them motivated and they get bored easily :lol:. They're independent and have a terrier-ish temperament. It's a breed that needs a lot of mental stimulation in addition to physical exercise.

If you're looking for breed recommendations, maybe post some things you're looking for in a dog and how small you want :). I'd also think about how much grooming you're up for, how much exercise you can provide, etc.
nope iv had a few dogs, mostly big dogs but only one small dog in my life which was a shihtzue who passed away

as for things the dog must have,

no bigger then a beagle
must be good with kids (we have a little girl whos 2 months old)
must be good with cats (we have 3 )

as for physical exercise i be jogging again every moring again once my c-section wound heals, i should be able to start again next month, but were not getting a dog for awhile so i should be fine by then

were a family thats always on the go so weather were at the cottage or camping or taking walks,
I dont mind grooming but id rather as little hair as possible just incase of allergies.

keeping in mind we do live in an apartment.
 

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I've found that high-shedding, short-haired breeds set off allergies more but I think it depends on the person.

Have you considered a Toy or Miniature Poodle? They're awesome family dogs that are active but calm indoors. They're easy to train and don't shed much or at all. They also aren't quite as fragile as other small breeds which might make them better for small children.

And speaking of Beagles...they're great family dogs, too. You'd want one that's been tested around cats but they're normally great with kids and are easy-going when exercised.

To be honest, a Miniature Pinscher is not the first dog that comes to mind when I hear "good with kids" although you could probably find an individual who would work. I like the breed but they can be challenging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I've found that high-shedding, short-haired breeds set off allergies more but I think it depends on the person.

Have you considered a Toy or Miniature Poodle? They're awesome family dogs that are active but calm indoors. They're easy to train and don't shed much or at all. They also aren't quite as fragile as other small breeds which might make them better for small children.

And speaking of Beagles...they're great family dogs, too. You'd want one that's been tested around cats but they're normally great with kids and are easy-going when exercised.

To be honest, a Miniature Pinscher is not the first dog that comes to mind when I hear "good with kids" although you could probably find an individual who would work. I like the breed but they can be challenging.
hubby would never go for a poodle unfortunatley, hes not a big fan of them nor is he a fan of beagles unfortunatley :(as for your thought on miniature pinscher probably not being good with kids i think it would depend on the dog and the owner,as someone could say the same thing about any type of breed example a pitbull.
 

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True, but some breeds are more predisposed to certain traits. ANY dog can be an exception but breed does matter or people wouldn't bother researching the different breeds ;).

If you're set on a Min Pin that's fine but you asked for suggestions and my experience with the breed has been that they're very active, a bit challenging to train, and not tolerant of small children. I do like them as they excel at sports, are very sharp, and have a ton of personality. Just not the best dog for small children IMO. If you love the breed then maybe look at breed-specific rescues and select an adult that's been exposed to young kids :).

What types of dogs does your husband like? There are a TON of small breeds that could work :D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
True, but some breeds are more predisposed to certain traits. ANY dog can be an exception but breed does matter or people wouldn't bother researching the different breeds ;).

If you're set on a Min Pin that's fine but you asked for suggestions and my experience with the breed has been that they're very active, a bit challenging to train, and not tolerant of small children. I do like them as they excel at sports, are very sharp, and have a ton of personality. Just not the best dog for small children IMO. If you love the breed then maybe look at breed-specific rescues and select an adult that's been exposed to young kids :).

What types of dogs does your husband like? There are a TON of small breeds that could work :D.
im not stuck on a pin , he likes big dogs if any at all, but theres no way hes letting me get a big dog hes more of a cat person, so i have to look at cute small breeds, his only thing that hes askes is has to be good with kids and cats, and the ones iv shown him so far are a no go for him .
 

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I think Bostons are a great breed amazing family dogs. My sister has a shih tzu poodle he doesnt at all look like a poodle and doesnt really aggravate allergies.

As for dogs having a predisposition that depends more on the dog than the breed that is my biggest problem people judging a breed judge the individual. Min pins could work just find one with the right personality personally I think they are a little too fragile for a small child :)
 

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I think Bostons are a great breed amazing family dogs. My sister has a shih tzu poodle he doesnt at all look like a poodle and doesnt really aggravate allergies.

As for dogs having a predisposition that depends more on the dog than the breed that is my biggest problem people judging a breed judge the individual. Min pins could work just find one with the right personality personally I think they are a little too fragile for a small child :)
It does depend on the individual but you can't ignore the fact that breeds do differ in temperament ;). Of course, the breed standards tend to apply more to well-bred dogs and not the puppy mill/BYB dogs that most people have.

I don't think it's good to judge a dog solely on breed but it's a starting point when deciding what breed to get. There's a reason that we don't see many calm, lazy JRTs or crazy hyper Basset Hounds :lol:.

Really, the only way to be certain (to a degree) of temperament is to adopt an adult that's been living in a home (not a kennel). Puppies change a lot and dogs in shelter environments act differently than they would in a home.

I do agree that Boston Terriers are good with kids, though, and generally fine with cats :). I've never personally cared for one (I'm hesitant to suggest breeds I don't have personal experience with) but have known a few.

Nibbler, is there a certain look that he likes? Since Poodles and Beagles look pretty different :lol:. How about a Bichon Frise? I had the pleasure of caring for one for a few weeks, she was awesome. They're sturdier than most toy breeds, don't shed much, are gentle with kids, and don't require a ton of exercise. They don't have much prey drive (if any) and should be good with cats (but we don't have any).

If you're up for the challenge (but fun, haha) of a terrier there are some more breeds I can recommend. But as you're probably aware, most terriers require more exercise than the average dog (morning jogs alone wouldn't cut it).

How do you feel about Pugs? That's another sturdy, easy-going breed. I don't know how much jogging one could handle, though :lol:. They also shed a lot.

On the larger side of your range, there's also the Corgi (Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh). I've never fostered a purebred one but the mixes I had seemed to fit breed standards. They're compact, sturdy, easy-going, active without being totally hyper, and playful.
 

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It does depend on the individual but you can't ignore the fact that breeds do differ in temperament ;). Of course, the breed standards tend to apply more to well-bred dogs and not the puppy mill/BYB dogs that most people have.

I don't think it's good to judge a dog solely on breed but it's a starting point when deciding what breed to get. There's a reason that we don't see many calm, lazy JRTs or crazy hyper Basset Hounds :lol:.

Really, the only way to be certain (to a degree) of temperament is to adopt an adult that's been living in a home (not a kennel). Puppies change a lot and dogs in shelter environments act differently than they would in a home.

I do agree that Boston Terriers are good with kids, though, and generally fine with cats :). I've never personally cared for one (I'm hesitant to suggest breeds I don't have personal experience with) but have known a few.

Nibbler, is there a certain look that he likes? Since Poodles and Beagles look pretty different :lol:. How about a Bichon Frise? I had the pleasure of caring for one for a few weeks, she was awesome. They're sturdier than most toy breeds, don't shed much, are gentle with kids, and don't require a ton of exercise. They don't have much prey drive (if any) and should be good with cats (but we don't have any).

If you're up for the challenge (but fun, haha) of a terrier there are some more breeds I can recommend. But as you're probably aware, most terriers require more exercise than the average dog (morning jogs alone wouldn't cut it).

How do you feel about Pugs? That's another sturdy, easy-going breed. I don't know how much jogging one could handle, though :lol:. They also shed a lot.

On the larger side of your range, there's also the Corgi (Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh). I've never fostered a purebred one but the mixes I had seemed to fit breed standards. They're compact, sturdy, easy-going, active without being totally hyper, and playful.
well for looks i have no idea , weve decided were gonna read about a bunch of breeds and visit diffrent breeders so that we can interact with dogs of diffrent types so that we can find out more info about the breed :) we definetly dont want a puppy we have decided on an adult.But im still open to hearning about peoples experiences with small breeds :thumbsup:
 

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Wirehair fox terriers are fun little dogs, personality of a large dog in a compact body. Normally pretty sturdy and tolerant of handling.

Cocker spanials can be either really good with kids, or really really bad with kids, not many in between that i have met.

schnauzers i love, my dog is a yorkie schnauzer that is good with everything. but i've had him since he was 9 weeks old.
 

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Cocker spanials can be either really good with kids, or really really bad with kids, not many in between that i have met.
I actually thought of Cockers, too, but wasn't sure if they were small enough. Ours are pretty small (20 lbs) but most are bigger. Awesome dogs though I'm biased :lol:.

Well-bred Cockers are great with kids if socialized. Usually the problematic Cockers are the puppy mill dogs (and that's unfortunately a good percentage of Cockers, they've been over-bred). We have three and all of them are fine with kids, Bambi loves anyone who will throw a ball :lol:.
 

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For adopting an adult you will really want to test the dog first. Cockers can be quick mood changers from what i have seen at the shelter, probably 3 out of 4 we get aren't great with kids, but many are from older peoples homes where kids may not have been around.
 

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For adopting an adult you will really want to test the dog first. Cockers can be quick mood changers from what i have seen at the shelter, probably 3 out of 4 we get aren't great with kids, but many are from older peoples homes where kids may not have been around.
Again, those Cockers don't fit breed standard and were probably from puppy mills and BYBs. Cockers also do HORRIBLE in the shelter environment (this is true of most spaniels, actually). It really breaks them and many of those dogs shine when adopted or in foster care. I know our Cockers would fail temperament testing at most shelters even if they're fine in the real life version of those situations.

That's why I recommended that an adult dog for a home with kids is only adopted if it's been tested in a home environment (meaning the dog is being privately adopted or is in foster care). That goes for all breeds.
 

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Cockers are awesome dogs. My family had one growing up and she was very loving. Calm and cuddly inside the house but had plenty of energy to go on hikes or play outdoors. The one we had was amazing with children and also good around other animals.

The one we had was a puppy mill rescues but she had a very sweet, even temperament. We did have a few behavioral as well as medical issues with her but we attributed most of those to bad breeding/genetics/experiences. Overall she was an amazing family pet.

If you're looking for a specific breed/temperament etc, like was already mentioned I'd probably look into adult dogs who are in a foster home situation. It's not unusual for dogs in shelter situations to seem like completely different dogs once they are out of the shelter and in a home. Sometimes the changes can be good, sometimes not so good depending. For some people this isn't a huge deal and they can work around any personality or behavioral changes that come up. For others it's not as easy of a thing to deal with. A great thing about dogs in foster homes is that the people fostering should be able to tell you a lot of details about the dog that you probably wouldn't learn right away if you adopted a dog out of a shelter.

Start by reading about breed standards for breeds you think you're interested in. They'll always be the odd dog that doesn't fit it's standard, but in general breed standards are a great place to start when you want to get a general feel of what that type of dog will be like. After you narrow down breeds, start going out to meet individual dogs and asses their individual personalities the best you can.

If you can't find the dog you're looking for in a shelter/foster home/rescue, have you considered looking into breeders who are looking for homes for older dogs? It's not uncommon for some breeders to also have adult dogs who need new homes. If going for that option I'd look for breeders who raise their dogs in their homes (not in kennels) and can tell you more about the individual dog's personality. Also read up on what makes a good breeder and what to avoid.
 

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As one with plenty experience of the cycle of a terrier I must beat the dead horse by repeating that they require such ridiculous stimulation and attention and exercise that I know for a new small family it can become a challenge.

For example: being the only one home in a +100 km/hour winds and snowy blizzard and having to take the dog out for a run.

Weather, while easy to ignore, becomes the reason people don't walk their dogs. I had to wake up regardless of the weather and take Coco out. We had a backyard, sure. But a backyard is no substitute for a real walk.

Erm... A hyper terrier type can easily knock a toddler down, take her toys, bark loudly, chew things, run around, and ignore recall. A bored terrier is not a happy terrier!

So unless you REALLY meet some people involved with rescue work on the breeds you guys are looking at you have to consider it in the long run.

Nobody in my family expected Coco to live 14 years I'm sure. That;s how I ended up with him. Everyone else got bored of the walks, the energy, having to live their lives around him and coming home to walk him or play with him.

If you're considering a mini-pin, talk to people at the shelter about mixes and their experience with the breed. I find toy breeds are hit or miss with children bc of the over breeding. It messes with the breed standards. (the breed most notable for this in my mind are cocker spaniels and cavalier king charles spaniel)
Also, and I'm not a huge fan anyway, are pomeranians and chihuahua's. Insecure and stubborn and often abandoned at shelters bc they no longer make cute acessories.

Anyway, most of what I said here is redundant. Take it or leave it.
 

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then very few dogs would be adopted.
I'm not sure what you mean by this :confused:.

If I had a very young child AND cats then yes, I would only adopt from a situation where the dog has been in a home unless maybe the shelter allows trial runs. Dogs in shelters often act differently than they would in a home.

Cullen, a foster dog I had a while back (winter before last), exemplified this. In the shelter environment and also when he was first in foster care, he was extremely calm, quiet, and also a bit nervous. He slept all day, didn't get into any trouble, and would have been labeled as a great apartment dog. Once he got settled into the house he was a completely different dog...loud and VERY energetic, requiring tons of exercise and supervision. He was no longer an appropriate dog for an apartment (in most cases) nor would I have recommended him go to a family with small children (he went from being easy-going to nippy/mouthy and shorter tempered). You can't rely on shelter behavior IMO. Would I adopt a dog from a shelter with no background info? Yeah, of course. But I don't have cats or kids. If I did, I'd adopt a dog from a private home, a breeder, or a rescue that places dogs in foster care.
 

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At the shelter i work for, we try and get as many dogs into foster homes but not many people want to foster dogs, or cats. Most of the people that adopt want family dogs, and if they were limited to dogs in foster home 99% of our dogs would be out.

kids should not be left alone with any new dog, from a foster home or a breeder or a shelter.
 

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At the shelter i work for, we try and get as many dogs into foster homes but not many people want to foster dogs, or cats. Most of the people that adopt want family dogs, and if they were limited to dogs in foster home 99% of our dogs would be out.

kids should not be left alone with any new dog, from a foster home or a breeder or a shelter.
And do you guys allow trial runs? If so, great, that can be a good way to see how a dog is, too. Provided the trial is long enough.

If not then I'm afraid that, no, I wouldn't adopt a dog from that shelter if I had cats and small children. But that's just me and we may have to agree to disagree.
 
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