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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1.Which is better aquarium or cage with really close bars?
2.What is a good mouse food at the pet store?
3.I only have pet stores nearby so would it be okay to buy them at a pet shop?
4.What are some good treats for them?
5.What stuff would you recommend in the cage/aquarium?Besides water bottle,food bowl,?
6.How do you hold a mouse?How do you pick the mouse up?
7.How long do they live?

Thanks for the answers :dream:.
 

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Official Loofah Tester
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1,365 Posts
Hey there. :)

1.Which is better aquarium or cage with really close bars?

Some people prefer cages for their ventilation, but mice are such chewers and escape artists, most people prefer an aquarium. As long as you keep it clean to prevent the build up of ammonia, then an aquarium is fine.


2.What is a good mouse food at the pet store?

This one I can't answer. I wasn't educated properly on feeding my mice when I had mine.

3.I only have pet stores nearby so would it be okay to buy them at a pet shop?

People are going to give you different answers. I'll just give you the pros and cons so you make your own decision. :)

Pet Shop Pro: Easily available with a wide variety.

Pet Shop Cons:
--- Pet shops cannot properly sex mice no matter what they promise. While it probably won't happen, for this reason you should expect your female to come home pregnant.

--- Pet shops mice are mill bred mice and pet shops do not observe quarantine. Not only does purchasing a mouse from a pet store promote abusive treatment of mill animals, your mice will have higher chance of skittishness, aggression, behavioral problems, poor immune system, and come home with communicable illness that transfers to your other pets.

To lower your chances of coming home with a sick, skittish, or aggressive pet, you can do the following:
When you are choosing a new mouse from a pet store, look first at their healthy appearance and insist on handling them. Only take the ones who are healthy with bright, clear eyes, smooth healthy coat, and no obvious respiratory problems (if you can hear their breathing or if they are making a lot of squeaky sounds, they are probably sick).

Also, put your hand in the cage. Select only ones who are curious about you. After a while gently and carefully pick it up in your hands. Only choose them if they are calm enough not to freak out when you touch/handle/hold them. A little hesitation or reluctance is fine, but freaking out terror is not. If they bite at all, don't choose them. There are many variables, but until you become comfortable enough with them to know how to work with behavioral issues, you can avoid most of them by only picking calm, curious, and friendly little mice. Even if it means not taking one home on your first visit to the pet store because none of them were friendly, that's okay. You'll be happier by waiting or visiting different pet stores to find the one who is a good match for you. The last thing you should look at when selecting a mouse is the color of their coat.

The first mouse I brought home was completely unhandleable. She bit me in the pet store, and dove out of my hand twice in the petting room. I picked her because she was the prettiest in the cage. She turned out to have some kind of obsessive compulsive disorder. She never calmed down and ran herself to a heart attack on her mouse wheel.

Breeder/Rescue Pros: Mice will be handled regularly and if they come from a reputable breeder, they'll have better temperaments and health, and often be bigger and prettier.

Breeder/Rescue Cons: They just flat out aren't available. Most breeders only breed mice for snake food. The closest mouse breeder to me is four hundred miles away. I have yet to find a mouse rescue. I got all of my mice from a pet store, and have no qualms about having done so.


4.What are some good treats for them?

Mine loves millet. I can't remember what all they ate anymore. Perhaps someone else will tell you.

5.What stuff would you recommend in the cage/aquarium?Besides water bottle,food bowl,?
As many climbing tunnels and hidey holes as you can find and material they can nest with. They don't have to be expensive. Toilet paper rolls are awesome. Also, I gave them a tissue box with tissue in it to shred.

6.How do you hold a mouse?How do you pick the mouse up?

Take some time to let them get used to you. Put your hand in the cage flat, and let them investigate. Put a treat in your hand to encourage them to climb on your hand on their own. Talk to them a lot to get them used to your voice.

Never swoop down above them to pick them up. Predators swoop down from above. Mice are hard wired to wig out over that. Put your hand flat on the floor next to the mouse and calmly and smoothly scoop your hands under their body from the sides so they see you coming. If you only have one hand, gently herd them into a corner of their cage and use the side of the cage to help you scoop them up.

If they wig and bolt, don't bolt after them. Just calmly and smoothly try again. Your calm body language will do wonders. Talk to them constantly while you pick them up. Predators are silent. Good friendly giant human hands are not. :)

Never pick them up by the tail. It hurts and mice tails can easily be broken or the skin can be stripped off in a painful injury called de-gloving.

7.How long do they live?

Most live about two years.
 

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Official Loofah Tester
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Also, you didn't ask this, but when picking mice, it's good to know that females can be kept in groups of two or more. Males must be kept alone, by themselves. They will kill other male mice, and they will breed uncontrollably with female mice. Males will also have a much stronger scent to them, so if odor unacceptable at your house, don't pick a male.

Males are sweet and do fine by themselves, but it's good to know everything before you choose them.
 

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Mouse Obsessor
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287 Posts
These are all great answers. I just wanted to add some treats to the list.
Green Leaf Lettuce, Cheerios, Yogies, Bird Seed Bars, Cheesey Chews (from Walmart), Some mice like small bits of Timothy Hay, and of course veggies. Mine like leafy veggies
Oh, and for toys. Napkins, mine love napkins. Also small cardboard boxes (mac & cheese, hamburger helper, ect..). And these beds called Hamster Cubes you can buy at Petco, all mine have been obsessed with those.
Good luck with mice ownership. They are wonderful animals. :)
 
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